US coronavirus cases rising sharply as Delta variant spreads

·3-min read


US coronavirus cases rising sharply as Delta variant spreads
US coronavirus cases rising sharply as Delta variant spreads

08 Jul 2021: US coronavirus cases rising sharply as Delta variant spreads

Coronavirus cases in the United States have once again begun rising as the highly-contagious Delta variant has spread further and vaccinations have considerably slowed down in the past couple of months. As of July 6, the weekly average of new infections was 13,859, up as much as 21% compared to just 14 days before, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Details: 24 US states see an uptick in cases

Twenty-four US states have seen a rise of at least 10% in COVID-19 cases over the past week, CNN reported. The significant spike comes even as there was low testing across the US during and after the July 4 holiday weekend, which marked the American Independence Day. CDC says the Delta variant now accounts for around 52% of all new infections in the country.

Variant: What is the Delta variant?

Delta, also known by its formal scientific name B.1.617.2, is said to be the most infectious coronavirus variant identified yet. It was first detected in India last year and was behind the country's deadly second wave of the pandemic earlier this year. Some studies also suggest the variant may partially evade the immunity generated by the body after prior infection or vaccination.

Expert: 'Delta variant is COVID-19 on steroids'

Highlighting the threat posed by the variant, a former senior advisor to President Joe Biden's COVID-19 response team said, "We should think about the Delta variant as the 2020 version of COVID-19 on steroids." "It's twice as infectious. Fortunately, unlike 2020, we actually have a tool that stops the Delta variant in its tracks: It's called vaccine," Andy Slavitt told CNN earlier this week.

Quote: Important to look at hospitalizations, expert says

It is important to assess hospitalizations rather than infections in general, Amesh Adalja of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, said. "Increasingly, I think we have to start to shift our focus away from cases and really look at hospitalizations, because that's what the vaccine was designed to do - it was designed to decouple cases from hospitalization," Adalja said, according to AFP.

Vaccination: How is the vaccination drive going in the US?

The US has plenty of vaccine stocks and currently has one of the highest immunization rates across the globe, however, the pace of vaccination has slowed down over the past few months. Over 67% of all American adults have received at least one shot of the vaccine while 58% adults are fully vaccinated. Of the total population, more than 47% have been fully vaccinated.

Vaccine efficacy: Do vaccines work against the Delta variant?

Several vaccines have proven effective against emerging variants, including Delta. For instance, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is 88% effective against symptomatic infection caused by the Delta variant, two weeks after the second dose. Moderna's vaccine has also been found effective against this strain. Johnson & Johnson said earlier this month its vaccine also provides reliable protection against the variant.

World: Global COVID-19 death toll surpasses 40 lakh

In another grim reminder of the destruction caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, global deaths from the disease have now crossed four million (40 lakh). But three countries account for more than a third of all the reported fatalities. They are the US (over 6 lakh deaths), followed by Brazil (over 5 lakh) and India (over 4 lakh).

The news article, US coronavirus cases rising sharply as Delta variant spreads appeared first on NewsBytes.

Also see: COVID-19 Delta variant has been detected in all US states
Coronavirus: India's tally crosses 3cr; last 1cr in 50 days
Coronavirus: India reports lowest single-day spike in 91 days
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