In US B-schools, dip in interest from global students: report

The non-profit body, Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), has put up the data on its website.

THIS WEEK, 50 deans and 13 CEOs of business schools at major US universities wrote an open letter to President Donald Trump, seeking re-examination of the country’s visa policy and reform of the H-1B visa programme. They flagged an international non-profit organisation’s findings that the number of foreign students studying at US business schools has fallen.

The non-profit body, Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), has put up the data on its website. The data show that during the three years from 2016 to 2018, the volume of foreign applicants in US business schools witnessed growth in fewer and fewer programmes, and declined in more and more programmes.

The GMAC study shows the percentage of programmes in various countries reporting year-on-year changes in application volumes. In US business schools, there has been a steady reduction in the percentage of programmes that have registered growth in applications from international students. In half the programmes (48% in 2019), such applications have seen a decline. The GMAC attributed this trend to the “harsh rhetoric in the US on visa policies and immigration (that) is driving international students elsewhere.”

About 28 Indian business schools, it said: “Consistent with past years, the vast majority of applications to Indian programs were domestic this year (95%). Forty-six percent of programs grew their domestic application volume and 25 percent report that it stayed the same. Less than 1 in 3 report domestic application declines (29%).