Top statistics from the Bahrain GP

Benjamin Vinel

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Glenn Dunbar / LAT Images

Glenn Dunbar / LAT Images

Charles Leclerc became the 99th driver to score pole position in F1 on Saturday. Coincidentally, the 2019 Bahrain GP was the 999th F1 race.

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

Leclerc is the first driver from Monaco to take pole in F1. His countrymen Louis Chiron and Olivier Beretta never qualified higher than eighth.

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Andy Hone / LAT Images

The 21-year-old became the first driver to lead a race for 40 or more laps and not yet win it since Lewis Hamilton at the 2015 Monaco GP.

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Hamilton scored his 74th win in F1, putting him 17 victories away from Michael Schumacher's all-time record.

Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

It was also Hamilton's 53rd win with Mercedes compared to 72 for Schumacher with Ferrari, 38 for Sebastian Vettel with Red Bull and 35 for Ayrton Senna with McLaren.

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

2019 is the 13th consecutive season (2007-2019) in which Hamilton has scored at least one race win. Only Schumacher has done better, with victories in 15 straight seasons between 1992 to 2006.

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Leclerc secured his first fastest lap in Bahrain and also the first for a Monegasque driver.

Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

With that Leclerc, who carries #16 on his car, became the first driver in F1 history to score 16 points (15 + one for fastest lap) in an F1 race.

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Leclerc also became the first Monegasque driver to score a podium since the 1950 Monaco GP.

LAT Images

LAT Images

It was none other than Chiron (pictured in 1955) who scored that podium in the first F1 world championship season, driving for Maserati.

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Hamilton's podium in Bahrain was his 136th. Schumacher has 155 poles to his tally while Vettel has 111.

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

While Valtteri Bottas had an uninspiring race, he still managed to lodge his 32nd podium finish, putting him level with Jean Alesi, Jacques Laffite as well as the legendary Jim Clark.

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Vettel led a grand prix for the 99th time in 221 starts. He trails Schumacher (142) and Hamilton (130).

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Vettel has now completed 10 races without scoring a win, his worst losing streak since 2016.

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Simon Galloway / Sutton Images

Max Verstappen finished fourth at Sakhir, which ended his podium streak of six races.

Steven Tee / LAT Images

Steven Tee / LAT Images

Lando Norris became the 60th British driver to score points in F1. For comparison, 51 drivers from the USA, 47 from Italy and 38 from France have scored points.

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Kimi Raikkonen finished inside the points for the 206th time on Sunday. That compares with 221 for Schumacher, 202 for Fernando Alonso and 194 for Hamilton.

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Andy Hone / LAT Images

With ninth, Alexander Albon became the second Thai driver in the history of F1 to bag a points finish.

LAT Images

LAT Images

He follows in the footsteps of Prince Bira, who secured three top-five finishes between 1950 and '54 with Maserati.

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

Jerry Andre / Sutton Images

Romain Grosjean endured his 42nd DNF from 145 starts last weekend, a retirement rate of 28.97%. In 2012 he retired from eight of 19 races (42.11%).

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Zak Mauger / LAT Images

Carlos Sainz has already retired from as many races this year as he did in the entire 2018 season (two).

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Andy Hone / LAT Images

Both Daniel Ricciardo and Nico Hulkneberg's cars came to an abrupt stop with just over a handful of laps remaining. It marked Renault's first double retirement since the 2017 Mexican GP and first due to engine issues since 2003.