Top Asian News 4:45 a.m. GMT

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities have begun deploying a new surveillance tool: "gait recognition" software that uses people's body shapes and how they walk to identify them, even when their faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, "gait recognition" is part of a push across China to develop artificial-intelligence and data-driven surveillance that is raising concern about how far the technology will go. Huang Yongzhen, the CEO of Watrix, said that its system can identify people from up to 50 meters (165 feet) away, even with their back turned or face covered.

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — A New Zealand fisherman plucked a toddler from the ocean in a "miraculous" rescue after thinking he was watching a doll float past. Gus Hutt was at the beach checking his fishing lines at about 7:15 a.m. on Oct. 26 when he spotted the 18-month-old boy and reached out and grabbed his arm. "Even then, I still thought it was just a doll," he told local newspaper the Whakatane Beacon. "His face looked just like porcelain with his short hair wetted down. But then he let out a little squeak and I thought 'Oh god, this is a baby and it's alive.'" The boy, Malachi Reeve, had escaped from his parent's tent while they were sleeping while the family was camping at Matata Beach on the North Island during the quiet spring season.

TOKYO (AP) — Turkey's top diplomat has criticized the U.S. resumption of sanctions on Iran as unilateral, not wise and dangerous, calling for a dialogue and engagement instead. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, in Tokyo for talks with Japanese leaders, told reporters Tuesday that Turkey opposes sanctions because they don't achieve results. He said cornering Iran is not wise, isolating Iran is dangerous and punishing the Iranians is unfair. President Donald Trump's administration's resumption of sanctions on Iran took effect Monday, though eight major importers of Iranian oil, including Turkey and Japan, are spared temporarily from immediate penalties. Cavusoglu also urged Saudi Arabia to fully cooperate in the investigation of the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last month, demanding the country locate his missing body and hand over suspected collaborators.

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar's ruling party led by Aung San Suu Kyi won just over half the seats in by-elections to fill 13 of the 1,171 seats in national, regional and state parliaments, according to complete preliminary results. Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy took seven of the 13 seats made vacant by death or resignation. Initial results for 12 races showed it had won six seats, and the delayed result for the 13th race, for a lower house constitutency in western Chin State, gave it its seventh victory. The results for Saturday's polls showed the NLD generally retaining support in the country's heartland, but yielding seats to parties representing ethnic minorities in the areas where they live, mostly in border regions.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will be traveling to New York on Thursday to meet with his North Korean counterpart, Kim Yong Chol. The State Department says the top U.S. envoy for North Korea, Stephen Biegun, will join Pompeo and Kim to discuss efforts toward what it calls "achieving the final, fully verified denuclearization" of North Korea. Over the weekend, North Korea criticized the U.S. for its continued support of sanctions and hinted it may resume nuclear development. Pyongyang accused Washington of derailing commitments made by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump at their June summit in Singapore.

KAOHSIUNG, Taiwan (AP) — A sprawling complex of four theaters billed as the biggest performing arts center in the world has opened in southern Taiwan. The National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts houses a 1,981-seat concert hall, a 2,236-seat opera house, a play house and a recital hall under a single roof covering 3.3 hectares (8.2 acres). The opening season offers a range of artistic performances. The debut installation opera "Paradise Interrupted" is an international co-production with New York's Lincoln Center Festival, the Spoleto Festival USA and the Singapore International Festival of Arts. The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra under Gustavo Dudamel, who conducts in Taiwan for the first time, will perform in the venue's vineyard-style concert hall.

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The "black box" data recorder from a crashed Lion Air jet shows its airspeed indicator malfunctioned on its last four flights, investigators said Monday, just hours after distraught relatives of victims confronted the airline's co-founder at a meeting organized by officials. National Transportation Safety Committee chairman Soerjanto Tjahjono said the problem was similar on each of the four flights, including the fatal flight on Oct. 29 in which the plane plunged into the Java Sea minutes after taking off from Jakarta, killing all 189 people on board. Erratic speed and altitude on the plane's previous flight, from Denpasar on Bali to Jakarta, were widely reported and "when we opened the black box, yes indeed the technical problem was the airspeed or the speed of the plane," Tjahjono told a news conference.

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban launched an attack early Monday on a newly established joint Afghan army and police checkpoint in eastern Ghazni province, killing at least 13 soldiers and policemen, according to a provincial official. Afghan reinforcements were subsequently dispatched to the site of the attack in Khogyani district but were repeatedly ambushed along the way. And late on Sunday night, a Taliban attack in southern Kandahar province killed at least four policemen. The assaults came as a resurgent Taliban hold nearly half of Afghanistan, with near-daily attacks on Afghan security forces. The Taliban view the U.S.-backed government in Kabul as a dysfunctional Western puppet and have refused repeated offers to negotiate with it.

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Lawyers for two Reuters journalists sentenced to seven years in prison in Myanmar for possession of official documents are appealing the verdict, the news agency said Monday. Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had been reporting on a military-led brutal crackdown on the Muslim Rohingya minority when they were arrested and charged with violating Myanmar's colonial-era Official Secrets Act. They pleaded not guilty, saying they were framed by police. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled to Bangladesh to escape what U.N. officials and others charged was ethnic cleansing, or even genocide, by Myanmar security forces. The military denies the accusations.

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Tens of thousands of Sri Lankans marched Monday in support of a new government led by the country's former strongman, highlighting the political polarization in the Indian Ocean island nation. The rally near Parliament came amid a constitutional crisis sparked by President Maithripala Sirisena's move to oust Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, replace him with ex-leader Mahinda Rajapaksa and suspend Parliament. Wickremesinghe has refused to vacate his official residence, insisting he is the lawful prime minister and that the president had no constitutional right to replace him. Thousands of his supporters have been keeping vigil. Supporters of Rajapaksa at the rally chanted "Whose power is this?