Top Asian News 3:49 a.m. GMT

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — South Korean President Moon Jae-in arrived in North Korea on Tuesday for his third and possibly most challenging summit yet with leader Kim Jong Un in which he hopes to break an impasse in talks with the United States over the North's denuclearization and breathe energy into his own efforts to expand and improve relations between the Koreas. In what are by now familiar images of the two Korean leaders hugging and exchanging warm smiles, Kim greeted Moon at Pyongyang's airport. They have met twice this year at the border village of Panmunjom, but Moon's visit is the first by a South Korean leader to the North Korean capital in 11 years.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in have arrived at a guesthouse in Pyongyang where they are expected to have talks over lunch. Kim and Moon arrived at the Paekhwawon State Guesthouse in a black Mercedes convertible and were seen talking and adjusting their hair before stepping out of the backseat. Their wives also reportedly shared a separate vehicle to the guesthouse. The Paekwawon Guesthouse was also where former South Korean Presidents Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun stayed during their summits with Kim's father in 2000 and 2007.

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The main focus of outside attention to this week's inter-Korean summit is whether it can find ways to resolve the stalemated diplomacy on North Korea's nuclear program. Also at stake is what steps the Koreas will take to lower decades-long military tensions and improve ties. A look at the key issues on the agenda for the summit in Pyongyang between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in that is their third meeting this year: ___ DENUCLEARIZATION Since entering talks earlier this year, Kim has repeatedly promised to realize the "complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula," but without providing a detailed timetable or road map for the process.

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The huge civilian entourage Seoul sent to the latest inter-Korean summit includes the third-generation heir of South Korea's largest business group and a Colorado-born pop diva nicknamed the "Korean Beyonce." President Moon Jae-in's office said the 52-member "special" entourage will help promote civil exchanges and engagement with younger Koreans. Some experts believe Moon is preparing for the resumption of inter-Korean economic cooperation projects after diplomacy eventually yields results. Currently, all major joint economic projects between the Koreas remain stalled because of U.S.-led sanctions. What the civilian delegation will do in North Korea has not been formally announced.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration will impose tariffs on $200 billion more in Chinese goods starting next week, escalating a trade war between the world's two biggest economies and potentially raising prices on goods ranging from handbags to bicycle tires. The tariffs will start at 10 percent, beginning Monday of next week, and then rise to 25 percent on Jan. 1. President Donald Trump made the announcement Monday in a move that is sure to ratchet up hostilities between Washington and Beijing. Trump has already imposed 25 percent tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese goods. And China has retaliated in kind, hitting American soybeans, among other goods, in a shot at the president's supporters in the U.S.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa said Monday that he plans to blast off on the first-ever private commercial trip around the moon and will invite six to eight artists, architects, designers and other creative people on the weeklong journey "to inspire the dreamer in all of us." The SpaceX Big Falcon Rocket is scheduled to make the trip in 2023, company founder Elon Musk announced at an event Monday at its headquarters near Los Angeles. Maezawa, 42, said he wants his guests for the lunar orbit "to see the moon up close, and the Earth in full view, and create work to reflect their experience." Musk said the entrepreneur, founder of Japan's largest retail website and one the country's richest people, will pay "a lot of money" for the trip, but declined to disclose the exact amount.

ITOGON, Philippines (AP) — Dozens of people believed buried in a landslide unleashed by Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines probably did not survive, a mayor said Monday, although rescuers kept digging through mud and debris covering a chapel where they had taken shelter. Of the 40 to 50 miners and their families believed inside the chapel, there is a "99 percent" chance that they all were killed, said Mayor Victorio Palangdan of Itogon, the Benguet province town that was among the hardest hit by the typhoon that struck Saturday. Mangkhut already is confirmed to have killed 66 people in the Philippines and four in China, where it weakened to a tropical storm as it churned inland Monday.

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Vendors selling everything from car batteries to "kangaroo essence" health pills have descended on Pyongyang for an international trade fair. Though North Korea continues to be one of the most heavily sanctioned countries in the world, this year's trade fair, which opened in the North Korean capital on Monday, includes more than 320 companies and is making something of a comeback, with many Chinese entrepreneurs taking part. Almost all of the companies with stalls at the fair are from North Korea or China. But several other countries are represented — a Russian medical technology company is selling heart-beat monitoring wrist watches, for example, and the kangaroo capsules, supposedly good for the health, are being sold by a New Zealand company.

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United States and Russia clashed Monday over enforcing U.N. sanctions against North Korea, with the U.S. ambassador accusing Moscow of "cheating" and Russia's envoy accusing Washington of "political ill-intent." The acrimonious meeting of the Security Council was called by U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, who accused Russia of pressuring independent U.N. experts to alter a report on implementation of sanctions against North Korea that she said contained "evidence of multiple Russian sanctions violations." The sharp disagreement marked a rare break in what has been a united response by the U.N.'s most powerful body to North Korea's escalating nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Public fears about sewing needles concealed inside strawberries on supermarket shelves have spread across Australia and New Zealand as growers turn to metal detectors and the Australian government launches an investigation to restore public confidence in the popular fruit. The government of Queensland state, where the contamination scare started last week, offered a 100,000 Australian dollar ($72,000) reward for information leading to the arrest of the person responsible for inserting needles into strawberries after six brands — Donnybrook Berries, Love Berry, Delightful Strawberries, Oasis, Berry Obsession and Berry Licious — were recalled. The scare had spread across the nation by Monday, with needles reported found in strawberries in all six Australian states.