Tahiliani’s Drapes, Amit Aggarwal’s Sustainable Couture Rule AIFW

Guru-shishya relationships are celebrated in many fields, from sports, to dance, to business, even. And the relationship found a mention in the Indian fashion industry too. At the grand finale of Amazon India Fashion Week, Autumn Winter 2017, designers Tarun Tahiliani and protégé Amit Aggarwal presented their collections together in a spectacular show, that saw over 80 looks interpreting Amazon’s “Fresh New Look” theme.

While nomadic Indian tribes provided the creative inspiration for Tarun Tahiliani’s line, juxtaposing it with motifs from Mughal armory-inspired art formed the soul of his ready-to-wear line.

Tarun Tahiliani’s Grand Finale Collection. (Photo: FDCI)

The jewel tones in the collection, that include capri emerald, midnight lapiz, rich claret, indigo, spicy reds, aubergine and aged rust along with black, cream and beige, are according to the designer, an ode to the Fall.

Tarun Tahiliani’s Grand Finale Collection. (Photo: FDCI)

Tahiliani’s collection included modern ethnic separates that were divided into eight categories (Polka, Kashuti, Chikankari, Mondrian Damask, Renaissance Stripes, Constructed Drapes, Golden Weave and Hussar). The Polka range had polka patterns made using Ajrakh on jumpsuits, dresses, tunics, gilets and shirts. The Kasuti collection took inspiration from bidri art and highlighted it on capes, draped tunics, kurtas and jumpsuits. The Chikankari collection had resham embroidery on damask prints. While the Mondrian Damask range was colour blocked with dramatic motifs inspired by Piet Mondrian’s paintings and art.

The Constructed Drapes collection, of course, bore the atelier’s trademark draping style, which has highlighted with thread embroidery.

While topography and architecture provided the inspiration for Amit Aggarwal’s AW’17 couture collection.

Amit Aggarwal’s Grand Finale collection. (Photo: FDCI) 
Amit Aggarwal’s Grand Finale collection. (Photo: FDCI) 

In this collection too, the designer continues his journey of recycling and upcycling, working on a series of outfits developed from vintage textiles, that were once unused saris, and combining them with recycled waste.

Adding his creations to the new wave of sustainable couture, the designer has used pre-owned patola sarees and Benaras brocades, and treated them with industrial methods like pleating and weaving with recycled metallic strips, to create eclectic new age outfits.