Study associates stressed brain to broken heart

According to the findings of a new research published in the European Heart Journal, stressful events are linked to the risk of developing a rare heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), also known as 'broken heart' syndrome. Heightened activity in the brain, caused by stressful events, is linked to the risk of developing a rare and sometimes fatal heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), also known as 'broken heart' syndrome, according to new research drove by European Society of Cardiology. The research was published in the European Heart Journal. The study found the greater the activity in nerve cells in the amygdala region of the brain, the sooner the condition known as Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) can develop. The researchers suggest that interventions to lower this stress-related brain activity could help to reduce the risk of developing TTS; these could include drug treatments or techniques for lowering stress. TTS, also known as "broken heart" syndrome, is characterised by a sudden temporary weakening of the heart muscles that causes the left ventricle of the heart to balloon out at the bottom while the neck remains narrow, creating a shape resembling a Japanese octopus trap, from which it gets its name.