Stress may take a toll on your heart

Washington, December 18 (ANI): Answers to questions like, "How stressed do you feel?" or "How often are you stressed?" may help predict one's risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) or death from CHD.

This is according to a new meta-analysis of six studies involving nearly 120,000 people. The study was led by Columbia University Medical Center researchers.

The six studies included in the analysis were large prospective observational cohort studies in which participants were asked about their perceived stress (e.g., "How stressed do you feel?" or "How often are you stressed?").

Respondents scored either high or low; researchers then followed them for an average of 14 years to compare the number of heart attacks and CHD deaths between the two groups. Results demonstrate that high perceived stress is associated with a 27 percent increased risk for incident CHD (defined as a new diagnosis or hospitalization) or CHD mortality.

"While it is generally accepted that stress is related to heart disease, this is the first meta-analytic review of the association of perceived stress and incident CHD," said senior author Donald Edmondson, PhD, assistant professor of behavioral medicine at CUMC.

"This is the most precise estimate of that relationship, and it gives credence to the widely held belief that general stress is related to heart health. In comparison with traditional cardiovascular risk factors, high stress provides a moderate increase in the risk of CHD - e.g., the equivalent of a 50 mg/dL increase in LDL cholesterol, a 2.7/1.4 mmHg increase in blood pressure or smoking five more cigarettes per day," he explained.

"These findings are significant because they are applicable to nearly everyone," said first author Safiya Richardson, MD, who collaborated with Dr. Edmondson on the paper while attending the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (she graduated in 2012 and is currently a resident at North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System in Manhasset, New York).

"The key takeaway is that how people feel is important for their heart health, so anything they can do to reduce stress may improve their heart health in the future," Richardson added.

The researchers did further analysis to try to learn what might underlie the association between stress and CHD. They found that while gender was not a significant factor, age was. The people in the studies were between the ages of 43-74; among older people, the relationship between stress and CHD was stronger.

"While we do not know for certain why there appears to be an association between age and the effect of perceived stress on CHD, we think that stress may be compounding over time. For example, someone who reports high perceived stress at age 60 may also have felt high stress at ages 40 and 50, as well," Dr. Edmondson said.

He also noted that older individuals tend to have worse CHD risk factors such as hypertension to begin with, and that stress may interact with those risk factors to produce CHD events.

The study was published in a recent issue of the American Journal of Cardiology. (ANI)