On Late Starts and Growing-Up: Gome Gomez’s Ascension to Global Entrepreneur

Brand Voice
·2-min read

Those with youths spent rebelling against authority tend to have similar stories: if you can push through, you’ll find great success, but if you succumb to apathy, you’ll consistently be disappointed and dogged by low self-esteem. For Gome Gomez, it could have gone either way. As a teenager, he faced expulsion, a dearth of confidence in himself and from others, and a lack of purpose. But, like any rebel child will tell you, it’s the struggle that makes you stronger.

After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania and obtaining his MBA from Harvard Business School, Gomez now leads an impressive cadre of professionals at Grupo Tracsa, his family business, a position he landed in following stints at Bain Capital and Nexxus Capital.

At UPenn, Gomez discovered his affinity for mentorship, a natural fit given his unruly adolescence, and a revelation that persuaded him to cofound a chapter of the Kairos Society. As the campus chapter President, Gomez propelled Kairos to become one of the most distinguished entrepreneurial incubators in the world. Collectively, Kairos-backed companies, which include Casper, Periscope, Fiscal Note, Freenome, and Brex, have accumulated an aggregate value of more than 10 billion dollars.

A man with an extensive toolkit, Gomez also found the time to study and master Mandarin, a skill that he refined during a semester abroad in Beijing and later, during the year he spent living in Hong Kong, working for Bain Capital.

Combining his experience in finance with his eye for emergent technological trends, Gomez returned to his family business, Grupo Tracsa, forming the firm’s technology department that provides IoT telematic monitoring solutions for the Industrial Internet of Things, as well as B2B e-commerce interfaces. It’s his goal to make the relationship between companies and their equipment more seamless by encouraging the maturation of intelligent machines.

Gomez’s resume is diverse and a testament to his ambition. When he joined the board of the largest urban real estate development in Latin America, Distrito La Perla, in Guadalajara, he did so as its youngest member. Now, he’s poised to make a massive impact on Guadalajara, where the group has focused its interests.

Despite his relatively young age, 31, Gomez has also invested in or advised several tech companies that have achieved substantial success — these include Titan, Torch, Higo, and Go-X.

In many ways, it would have been easy for Gomez to take his foot off the gas and celebrate how far he’s come since his days of wrestling with authority. Nevertheless, he continues to trail-blaze because he knows, above all, that life’s only constant is change and those who adapt under adversity are better suited to navigate wherever the road takes them.

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