'Something happens to me PMC Bank, RBI would be responsible for it': Woman bed-ridden after fracturing her leg

A 68-year-old woman, who is bed-ridden ever since she fell in her home and fractured her leg, has blamed the Punjab and Maharashtra Cooperative (PMC) Bank for not able to pay for her medicines and post-operative care. She also said that if anything happens to her, bank should be held responsible.

According to Mumbai Mirror, Bina Mirchandani fell in her Bandra home on November 6 and fractured her leg. Despite having Rs 30 lakh in her PMC Bank savings account, she has had to borrow money from relatives for treatment and post-operative care. Bina told the leading daily, “Bank officials asked me to come to the branch and sign the form. I cannot move. I told them to come and see my condition and take the form from here.”

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The bank officials have informed her that if she applies for the money under medical hardship, the cheque will be directly issued to the hospital. The insurance has taken care of part of the hospital expenses, Bina needs money to hire help and buy medicines.

“My weight is 70 kg. At this age, my siblings can’t lift me or take care of me easily. After surgery I have had to hire two helpers, which costs me Rs 1,100 per day. Medicine and other things cost too. I will require money for a physiotherapist in a few days. If something happens to me I want to state it on record that PMC and RBI would be solely responsible for it,” Mirchandani told Mumbai Mirror.

Since the PMC crisis happened, seven PMC Bank depositor have died after restrictions were imposed on withdrawal of funds from the bank, leaving its depositors high and dry. The bank's depositors have been agitating, seeking that they be allowed to withdraw their money which is stuck due to an RBI-imposed cap.

The PMC Bank has been put under restrictions by the RBI after an alleged fraud of Rs 4,355 crore scam came to light following which the deposit withdrawal was initially capped at Rs 1000, causing panic and distress among depositors.