Solve Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi Dispute Amicably, Says Expelled AIMPLB Maulana Salman Nadwi

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Solve Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi Dispute Amicably, Says Expelled AIMPLB Maulana Salman Nadwi

Nadvi was expelled from the Board, three days after he suggested shifting the site of Babri Mosque from Ayodhya

New Delhi, Feb 11: Former executive member of All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB), Maulana Salman Nadwi, said for the unity of Hindu Muslim it is important to solve Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi dispute cordially.

Nadvi was today expelled from the Board, three days after he suggested shifting the site of Babri Mosque from Ayodhya. Nadvi went against the stand of the AIMPLB. The Board reiterated that its position on the issue of building a mosque in Ayodhya remains unchanged.

He further said that I was forced to step away. In last 25 years, court could not do anything so it is better to have an out of court settlement for peace and unity between both communities.

Nadvi said that why we need to wait for court hearing when we can sit and decide for peace and stop this situation.

Maulana, Nadvi, who teaches at the Islamic seminary of Nadwa Madrassa in Lucknow, has drawn flak from other senior members of the board who had called a meeting recently at Hyderabad.

Jamiat-ul-Ulema-e-Hind president Maulana Arshad Madani too opposed to Nadvi’s suggestion which he believed it is sabotaging Muslim claims over the disputed site in Ayodhya.

Maulana Madani also demanded action against Nadvi at the Hyderabad meeting. Both Madani and Nadvi are attending the Board meeting.

 “You cannot doubt his credibility and credentials as an Islamic scholar. His statement has been blown out of context. What he said makes sense,” Zafar Sareshwala supported Maulana Nadvi.

What is Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi dispute?

Hindus and Muslims have quarrelled for over a century over the history of the Babri mosque in Ayodhya, a town in Uttar Pradesh. Hindus claim that the mosque stands on the birthplace of their god-king Rama, and was built after the destruction of a Hindu temple by a Muslim invader in the 16th century. The dispute flared up in 1992 after a Hindu mob destroyed the mosque and nearly 2,000 were killed in rioting between Hindus and Muslims across the country.