Shopian Firing Case: Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Army Veteran’s Plea to Quash FIR Against Soldiers

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Shopian Firing Case: Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Army Veteran’s Plea to Quash FIR Against Soldiers

In his plea, Lt. Col. Singh told the court that his son Major Aditya Kumar, who has also been named in the FIR, was made an accused in what he described as an arbitrary exercise of power".

New Delhi, Feb 9: The Supreme Court has agreed to hear the plea filed by an Army veteran seeking quashing of FIR filed by the Jammu and Kashmir police over Shopian firing incident. The plea filed by ex-Lieutenant Colonel Karamveer Singh will be heard by the apex court on Monday, February 12.

In his plea, Lt. Col. Singh told the court that his son Major Aditya Kumar, who has also been named in the FIR, was made an accused in what he described as an “arbitrary exercise of power”. (Also Read: ‘My Son Was Doing His Duty’: Father of Major Named in Shopian Firing FIR Moves SC)

“Army personnel present there were doing lawful military duty peacefully and who, by violent actions of the mob, were forced to take lawful actions for protection of government property without any excessive use of force,” the petition said.

The Army had filed a counter FIR last month in response to the J&K police’s FIR over the killing of civilians that mentions soldiers from 10 Garhwal Rifles as the accused.

Three youths were killed in Ganowpora village of Shopian district in south Kashmir on January 27, when security forces opened fire after an army convoy came under a stone pelting attack.

Two youths, identified as Javaid Ahmad and Suhail Ahmad, died of bullet injuries the same day, while another, 19-year-old Rayees Ahmad Ganai, who was admitted in the hospital, succumbed to his injuries a few days ago. (Also Read: Shopian Firing: We Responded to Ultimate Provocation, Says Army)

In a statement, the Indian Army said the administrative convoy was passing through Ganaupura chowk when it came under “unprovoked and intense stone pelting” by a group of 100-120 people.

(With inputs from  agencies)