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  • Paracetamol/Tylenol in pregnancy may … Reuters - Wed 20 May, 2015
    Paracetamol/Tylenol in pregnancy may …

    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Pregnant women who take the painkiller paracetamol regularly for long periods may put their unborn sons' testosterone levels at risk, leading to possible reproductive problems later in life, researchers said on Wednesday. In a study using mice with grafts of human tissue, the scientists found that a week's paracetamol treatment led to a sharp fall in the production of testosterone, a hormone that is critical to men's life-long health. "We would advise that pregnant women should follow current guidance that the painkiller be taken at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time," said Rod Mitchell, a clinical research fellow at Edinburgh University who led the work.

  • Stephen Curry leads Warriors to a 1-0 … Sportskeeda - Wed 20 May, 2015
    Stephen Curry leads Warriors to a 1-0 …

    Details from Game 1 of the Western Conference finals between Golden State and Houston.

  • Clooney finds optimism at heart of a … Reuters - Wed 20 May, 2015
    Clooney finds optimism at heart of a …

    By Piya Sinha-Roy LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - In a break from the sea of dystopian offerings aimed at young adult audiences, the world of tomorrow is given a glossy, Disney makeover in the studio's latest big budget spectacular. "I loved the idea that it looked at the world saying 'the future is not what you see when you turn on the television and you get depressed and you're inundated with it.' It doesn't have to end that way." Not that the movie doesn't touch on the real world cynicism that many may feel when presented with an upbeat, Disney-fied view of a perfect world that can be achieved through the power of belief and imagination.

  • Chennai Super Kings is the most popular … Sportskeeda - Mon 18 May, 2015
    Chennai Super Kings is the most popular …

    Chennai Super Kings' Facebook popularity map.

  • Mozart-loving chickens may answer quest … Reuters - Sun 17 May, 2015
    Mozart-loving chickens may answer quest …

    By Naveen Thukral and Gavin Maguire YONG PENG, Malaysia (Reuters) - In barns filled with classical music and lighting that changes to match the hues outside, rows of chickens are fed a diet rich in probiotics, a regimen designed to remove the need for the drugs and chemicals that have tainted the global food chain. As food giants face growing pressure to offer healthier produce, Southeast Asian poultry firm Kee Song Group says its use of "good" bacteria in feed and water means it can meet one the industry's biggest challenges: how to mass produce drug and hormone-free poultry at a reasonable price. A series of scandals in the last few years from melamine-tainted milk powder in China, horse meat supplied as beef in Europe and growth drugs causing lameness in U.S. cattle has triggered a consumer backlash over food standards and safety. Recently, Tyson Foods Inc pledged to eliminate the use of human antibiotics in chicken by 2017, one of the most aggressive timetables yet by a U.S. poultry firm.

  • 5 classic heels Sheamus should study … Sportskeeda - Sun 17 May, 2015
    5 classic heels Sheamus should study …

    5 classic heels Sheamus should study to be more effective in his new role

  • Sentenced to death, Boston Marathon … Reuters - Sat 16 May, 2015
    Sentenced to death, Boston Marathon …

    By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Boston Marathon bomber Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was sentenced to death on Friday. A lengthy appellate process, an effective moratorium on federal executions and declining support among Americans for capital punishment all suggest that Tsarnaev’s death by lethal injection is far from a sure thing, according to death penalty experts. "With every passing year, the likelihood of execution will diminish," said Deborah Denno, a law professor at Fordham University who has studied capital punishment.

  • Weak climate deal would jeopardise new … Reuters - Fri 15 May, 2015
    Weak climate deal would jeopardise new …

    By Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The world's chances of achieving new international development goals will be slim without more ambitious action to curb climate change, researchers said. Pakistan, for example, is unlikely to be able to end poverty by 2030 if accelerating climate change brings worse weather disasters, water scarcity and other problems, a new report from the UK-based Climate and Development Knowledge Network said. Planned new sustainable development goals (SDGs) aimed at ending poverty, improving gender equality, and giving access to water and clean power have a much higher chance of being achieved if action to limit climate change is ambitious, the report's authors said. If the new sustainable development goals, expected to be agreed in New York in September, have strong targets, they could lift ambition in the year-end climate deal, the report said.

  • NASA finds Antarctic ice shelf a few … Reuters - Fri 15 May, 2015
    NASA finds Antarctic ice shelf a few …

    By Alex Dobuzinskis LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The last intact section of one of Antarctica's mammoth ice shelves is weakening fast and will likely disintegrate completely in the next few years, contributing further to rising sea levels, according to a NASA study released on Thursday. The research focused on a remnant of the so-called Larsen B Ice Shelf, which has existed for at least 10,000 years but partially collapsed in 2002. Antarctica has dozens of ice shelves - massive, glacier-fed floating platforms of ice that hang over the sea at the edge of the continent's coast line. Larsen B is located in the Antarctic Peninsula, which extends toward the southern tip of South America and is one of two principal areas of the continent where scientists have documented the thining of such ice formations.

  • Insight: How DNA sequencing is transforming … Reuters - Wed 13 May, 2015
    Insight: How DNA sequencing is transforming …

    The efforts will help researchers identify rare genetic mutations by scanning large databases of volunteers who agree to have their DNA sequenced and to provide access to detailed medical records. It is made possible by the dramatically lower cost of genetic sequencing - it took government-funded scientists $3 billion and 13 years to sequence the first human genome by 2003. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, which signed a deal with Pennsylvania’s Geisinger Health System in January 2014 to sequence partial genomes of some 250,000 volunteers, is already claiming discoveries based on the new approach. Company executives told Reuters they have used data from the first 35,000 volunteers to confirm the promise of 250 genes on a list of targets for drugs aimed at common medical conditions, including high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

  • Study finds numerous drug combinations … Reuters - Tue 12 May, 2015
    Study finds numerous drug combinations …

    By Zeba Siddiqui MUMBAI (Reuters) - Almost two-thirds of the drug combinations widely sold in India to fight pain, depression, and psychotic conditions lack the necessary regulatory approvals, despite some of the pills being banned internationally, a study published on Tuesday shows. India's reputation as a reliable supplier of cheap generic medicines has taken a hit after sanctions by the United States and Britain faced by some of its largest drugmakers over violations of standard drug-making practices. Thousands of fixed-dose combination drugs (FDCs), or cocktails of two or more medicines, are sold in India. Just 60 of the 175 pain, depression, anti-psychotic and diabetes FDC formulations sold in India between 2007 and 2012 had approval from the central government drugs regulator, they found.

  • George Clooney teams up with Disney … Reuters - Mon 11 May, 2015
    George Clooney teams up with Disney …

    George Clooney teams up with Disney for the expected summer box office hit "Tomorrowland", a futuristic adventure which the Hollywood actor says he was drawn to because of its hopeful message. Clooney, known for his roles in "Ocean's Eleven" and "Syriana", plays the jaded former boy-genius Frank, who joins teenage science-fan Casey (Britt Robertson) on a mission to unearth the secrets of a place somewhere in time and space called "Tomorrowland". The movie, which also stars British actor Hugh Laurie, is directed by Brad Bird, known for Academy Award-winning animated feature films "Ratatouille" and "The Incredibles".

  • Hunt for AIDS cure accelerates as GSK … Reuters - Mon 11 May, 2015
    Hunt for AIDS cure accelerates as GSK …

    By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's GlaxoSmithKline, which decided last week to retain rather than float off its HIV drugs business, is to collaborate with U.S. scientists in developing a cure for AIDS. The case of Timothy Brown, the so-called "Berlin patient" whose HIV was eradicated by a complex treatment for leukaemia in 2007, marked the first cure and the science has been advancing since then. GSK is tapping into the latest expertise by creating an HIV Cure centre with the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and establishing a new jointly owned company. Scientists will study various cure options, including a so-called "shock-and-kill" strategy developed at UNC, which unmasks dormant HIV hiding in white blood cells, so that it can be attacked by a boosted immune system.

  • 5 instances when top clubs gave arch … Sportskeeda - Sun 10 May, 2015
    5 instances when top clubs gave arch …

    A look at 5 historic instances in Europe when a football club had to give their arch rivals and league champions a guard of honour

  • Dogs, guns and weddings help U.S. investors … Reuters - Thu 7 May, 2015
    Dogs, guns and weddings help U.S. investors …

    When Kim Forrest attends dog shows, she is there not just for her two wirehaired pointing griffons. Forrest, who works for the Pittsburgh-based Fort Pitt Capital Group, believes participation in dog shows is as middle class as it gets and as such is a great economic gauge. Several analysts and investors look at unusual data, hoping it will help them spot economic trends sooner or understand them better than those who rely on conventional fare. "Many market strategists cling to the Fed minutes and other standard information," says Nick Colas, chief market strategist at the ConvergEx Group in New York.

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