Randy Candy: Health Ministry bans several snacks found to contain erectile dysfunction drug

Individuals looking for an, ahem, extra boost from certain snacks will be disappointed to learn that Malaysia’s Health Ministry has banned the sale and import of an energy candy that was found to contain a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction.


Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia (KKM) mengambil maklum produk Energy Candy yang didakwa mengandungi bahan terlarang yang…

Posted by Bahagian Keselamatan dan Kualiti Makanan, Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia on Sunday, February 16, 2020

Officials have banned ExtrAli Energy Candy, Extra Strong Energy Candy, and Mixed Fruit Candy, all of which were found to contain tadalafil, a drug used to treat E.D. that is banned under the Food Act 1983 without a prescription. A quick perusal online shows that the special candies are available for sale online via popular shopping platforms like Shopee and Lazada, with pack of 24 setting customers back less than RM10 (US$2.50).

For the record, misuse of tadalafil without proper supervision can lead to a series of complications including loss of vision and hearing, a decrease in blood pressure, stroke and/or heart attack.

Probably not the effect buyers are looking for, but people will do anything for love (or so we’ve been told).

Ministry Director-General Noor Hisham Abdullah has said that the government is issuing an immediate ban on the products, and is aware that they are readily available online.

He warned members of the public against consuming the product, and reminded citizens that if they are found guilty of distributing the randy candies, they could face a fine of up to RM100,000 (US$25,000) fine, and/or 10 years in the clink.

And with that warning, happy snacking!

This article, Randy Candy: Health Ministry bans several snacks found to contain erectile dysfunction drug, originally appeared on Coconuts, Asia's leading alternative media company. Want more Coconuts? Sign up for our newsletters!