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ISRO scientists and engineers cheer after India's Mars orbiter successfully entered the red planet's orbit, at their Spacecraft Control Center in Bangalore

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) scientists and engineers cheer after India's Mars orbiter successfully entered the red planet's orbit, at their Spacecraft Control Center, in this photo taken through a glass panel, in the southern Indian city of Bangalore September 24, 2014. India's low-cost mission to Mars successfully entered the red planet's orbit on Wednesday, crowning what Prime Minister Narendra Modi said was a "near impossible" push to complete the trip on its maiden attempt. The Mars Orbiter Mission cost $74 million or about three-quarters of the amount to make the Oscar-winning movie 'Gravity' about astronauts stranded in space. REUTERS/Abhishek N. Chinnappa (INDIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

ISRO celebrates Mars mission's success

India triumphed in its first interplanetary mission, placing a satellite into orbit around Mars on Wednesday morning and catapulting the country into an elite club of deep-space explorers. Scientists broke into wild cheers as the orbiter's engines completed 24 minutes of burn time to maneuver the spacecraft into its designated place around the red planet. Scientists described the final stages of the Mars Orbiter Mission, affectionately nicknamed MOM, as flawless. The success marks a milestone for the space program in demonstrating that it can conduct complex missions and act as a global launch pad for commercial, navigational and research satellites.