Parents can give goats as school fees instead of money in this country

As the burden of rising school fee increases on parents, Zimbabwe's education minister Lazarus Dokora has come up with a solution of its own kind.

As the burden of rising school fee increases on parents, Zimbabwe's education minister Lazarus Dokora has come up with a solution of its own kind.

The cash-strapped nation's education minister said that if the parents cannot pay their children's school fee they can offer livestock instead.

The country's daily, Sunday Mail, d Dokora as saying, ""Our schools have to be flexible and ensure those who do not have money to pay fees can work. For example, if there is a builder in the community, he/she must be given that opportunity to work as a form of payment of tuition fees."

"On the issue of livestock, the community has to arrange a market where everyone participates; from the school authorities, local leadership and parents themselves to avoid parents being duped", he further added.

Education ministry's permanent secretary Dr Sylvia Utete-Masango also backed Dokoro's comment and said that the schools should not send back students home in case they are unable to pay their fees. He stated that parents from rural areas should pay in form of livestock while parents staying in the urban areas should work for the school community.

"In terms of valuation, school heads will stand in for the Primary and Secondary Education Ministry and school development committee members for parents. They will jointly determine the value of the livestock, and can then use the money realised to upgrade school infrastructure or help with agriculture", Utete-Masango said to Sunday Mail.

The country is facing its worst economical crisis. Last year in December, Zimbabwe has sold 35 elephants to China to raise money for conservation.

The 35 elephants were captured from Hwange National Park and flown to China's Shanghai Exhibition Park, Beijing Wildlife Park and Hangzhou Wildlife Park.

The move was widely crtiscised by the animal welfare activists who termed this deal as an unethical one. The government also has sought to sell its ivory stockpile for millions of dollars.