Can Mouthwash Really Kill Coronavirus? Scientists and Doctors Are Arguing Over it

·2-min read

The search for a coronavirus killer, a vaccine has become life's mission for scientists who are researching on the virus and its cure. Various companies are at different stages of finding a cure. In a recent development, a new scientific study is claiming that mouthwash is effective in killing the coronavirus, that too in mere 30 seconds!

Scientists at the Cardiff University, who conducted the trials have reportedly found that oral mouth rinsing product can help in killing the coronavirus. A specialist periodontologist, who is part of the trial, Dr Nick Claydon, while explaining the findings of the study, spoke about how the mouthwash has shown early signs of being successful in killing the virus in the saliva, but there is no evidence to substantiate so far that that the mouthwash can be used to treat coronavirus because it cannot reach the lungs or respiratory area in the body, where the virus attacks the most.

The study has found that mouthwashes contain at least 0.07% cetypyridinium chloride (CPC), which in turn renders it effective in eradicating the virus when placed in specific conditions such as a lab. However, scientists are yet not clear as to how impactful the mouthwash will be as a proper treatment to coronavirus.

Another recent study has also found that CPC-based mouth rinsing products are helpful in reduction of virus count.

Scientists however, many of who are continuing their research with coronavirus have debunked the mouthwash claims, saying that much more study is needed in this area.

US-based scientist Dr Graham Snyder reportedly told CNN that there are many things that despite being helpful in killing a virus after coming into contact with it, cannot fully stop its source. Snyder, who is an associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine said that despite substances such as alcohol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide being able to kill viruses on contact or shortly after, there is no proof to show that they can stop transmission of the virus in any way.

Another scientist, Dr Donald Milton, who studies virus transmission at University of Maryland said that even though a mouthwash can kill the virus in your mouth, your nose, lung airway, lungs still contain the virus, which the mouthwash cannot kill.

Scientists at the Cardiff University, however have clarified that the research is yet to be reviewed by other researchers and therefore the report's findings should not be treated as a proper treatment for the coronavirus. The report is also going to be submitted for publication in a science journal. Scientists have urged people to continue with the government approved methods of virus transmission.