Man Wants Khan Market to be Renamed 'Valmiki Market', Netizens Aren't Too Happy About It

News18.com
Khan Market is one of the most well-known markets in Old Delhi and is also considered to be one of the most expensive high-end retail streets. The market was established in 1951 and consists of over 150 shops. As far as nomenclature is concerned, the market was named after Khan Abdul Jabbar Khan, a famed freedom fighter.

Recently, a man named Deepak Tanwar wrote a letter to Home Minister Rajnath Singh, requesting him to change the name of Delhi's iconic Khan Market. His preferred alternative? Valmiki Market. Yes, you heard that right.

As per news reports, Tanwar said that he had come up with the idea after watching an interview of PM Modi where the latter addressed elite media as the Khan Market Gang. Tanwar explains that Valmiki is an integral part of India's history and therefore, naming the famous market after him would simply help promote the country's rich mythological past.

Interestingly enough, Tanwar is in no way associated with the market. He is neither a resident nor does he own shops in the area.

For the unaware, Khan Market is one of the most well-known markets in Old Delhi and is also considered to be one of the most expensive high-end retail streets. The market was established in 1951 and consists of over 150 shops. As far as nomenclature is concerned, the market was named after Khan Abdul Jabbar Khan, a famed freedom fighter. The name was chosen by the first traders who set up shop in the area in an attempt to honour Khan whose efforts and sacrifice during the freedom struggle has been well-documented.

More than its history, Khan Market is an icon in itself and naturally, people did not quite take well to Tanwar's suggestion.

One Twitter user clarified the name, "Khan Market is named after Khan Abdul Jabbar Khan (brother of Gaffar Khan). It is named after him because at the time of partition he safely brought immigrants from what is now Pakistan to the area that is now Khan Market. People who still live there will tell you their history."




Even Mehbooba Mufti couldn't help but condemn the letter written by Tanwar:








Hopefully, the Indian government will take into account the opinions of these emotional Delhiites before changing the name of a market which is deeply embedded in the cultural history of the city.