India steps up efforts for Nirav Modi's extradition after arrest, shares more evidence with UK

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India steps up efforts for Nirav Modi's extradition after arrest, shares more evidence with UK

Nirav Modi is accused of defrauding state-owned Punjab National Bank (PNB) to the tune of Rs 13,000 crore along with Mehul Choksi, another key accused in the case.

Indian agencies have stepped up efforts to expedite Nirav Modi's extradition to India after the fugitive businessman was arrested in London on Tuesday (March 19).

After a UK court rejected bail appeal of the beleaguered diamantaire, Indian agencies have shared some more documents with the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) as evidence against Nirav Modi.

India has already submitted a chargesheet, FIR and non-bailable warrant order passed by Indian courts with UK authorities.

Officials have also informed CPS that an application has been filed in the court to declare Nirav Modi as a fugitive economic offender.

Nirav Modi is accused of defrauding state-owned Punjab National Bank (PNB) to the tune of Rs 13,000 crore with along with Mehul Choksi, another key accused in the case.

Sources have told India Today that the arrest of Nirav Modi has paved the way to start his extradition process in quick time.

Top sources, however, told India Today TV that Modi's problems may multiply after his extradition to India.

Once brought back, he is likely to be probed in connection with multiple cases.

Apart from the main fraud case, the Enforcement Directorate (ED), during the course of its investigation, found out that the value of diamonds was increased on paper even though the quality was "very poor".

Sources said Modi used to indulge in such activities purposefully to enhance the overall value of the company and fleece customers at the same time.

While politicians in India keep engaging in debates over how Modi was spotted, a UK journalist was the one who finally did it.

An exclusive report on The Telegraph UK had captured all details about the diamantiare's location in London.

Journalist Mick Brown tracked down the 48-year-old diamond merchant and found that he was living in a three-bedroom flat occupying half a floor of the landmark Centre Point tower block of luxury apartments.

(With inputs from Munish Chandra Pandey)