IND v AUS 2020: 'It's literally the worst feeling in the world' - Adam Zampa after dropping Virat Kohli

Srinjoy Sanyal
·2-min read

Adam Zampa dropped Virat Kohli on 1 in the first ODI
Adam Zampa dropped Virat Kohli on 1 in the first ODI

Australia leg-spinner Adam Zampa was guilty of dropping Indian captain Virat Kohli in the first ODI on Friday (November 27), and said after the game that grassing a catch is very difficult to come to terms with.

Australia took a 1-0 lead in the 3-match ODI series after beating the visitors by 66 runs at the SCG.

Pat Cummins dug in a bouncer which Virat Kohli (then on 1) tried to hook and ended up getting a top-edge. Adam Zampa, at long leg, positioned himself properly only to see the ball slip through his reverse-cup and hit the ground.

In an interview with ESPNcricinfo, Adam Zampa said dropping a catch is the “worst feeling in the world”, and that every run the batsman who got a reprieve scores after that makes him repent even further.

“It’s literally the worst feeling in the world. Each run you start to feel it after that, but from my point of view I was pretty keen to try and make amends with the ball. Fortunately, I didn’t end up having to bowl to him but it’s one of those things, you have to want to the next ball come to you and also want the ball and try and get the wicket as well,” Adam Zampa said.

Luckily for Adam Zampa and Australia, Josh Hazlewood snapped up Virat Kohli for a run-a-ball 21 and turned the tide in the hosts’ favour.

‘It’s really hard to imitate the pressure of one-day cricket,’ says Adam Zampa

Adam Zampa and Josh Hazlewood shared 7 wickets between them in the opening match
Adam Zampa and Josh Hazlewood shared 7 wickets between them in the opening match

Both India and Australia were culpable of dropping catches in the first ODI. While Virat Kohli’s drop was the highlight of the second innings, Steve Smith got a life on 34 when Shikhar Dhawan, who was at long on, came forward only to see the skier fall behind him and bounce into the boundary.

About failing to latch on to catches, Adam Zampa put the blame on training sessions, saying that the only way to bring the pressure of an ODI game into fielding drills is by enhancing the intensity of practice.

“I wouldn’t want to make excuses but it’s really hard to imitate the pressure of one-day cricket and the best way to do it was when you are together as a squad and you do fielding sessions and the intensity of the training is at that international standard,” Adam Zampa reasoned.

The leggie, however, was the star performer with the ball as he returned impressive figures of 4 for 54 in 10 overs. The second ODI between India and Australia is scheduled at the same venue on Sunday (November 29).