Haryana: One in 4 class 1 students can’t read letters

Haryana: One in 4 class 1 students can’t read letters

According to the report, released by NGO Pratham, its teams surveyed 1,415 children in the age-group of 4-8 years in 1,203 households in 59 villages. (Representational Image)

As many as 24.5 per cent class 1 students in schools of rural areas of Haryana’s Hisar can’t even read letters, as per the 14th Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) released Tuesday.

According to the report, released by NGO Pratham, its teams surveyed 1,415 children in the age-group of 4-8 years in 1,203 households in 59 villages. The report shows that among the children enrolled in class 1, as many as 43.4 per cent children are four and five years old while 30.3 per cent are six, 20.9 per cent are seven, and 5.4 per cent are 8 years old. As many as 66 per cent of the four year-old children study in private schools while rest are in government schools and anganwaris.

Of all 4-year-olds, 0.5 per cent are not enrolled anywhere while 82.8 per cent are in a pre-primary class, 13.9 per cent are in class 1, and 2.9 per cent are in class 2 or above. Pre-primary includes children going to anganwaris, government pre-primary classes and private LKG/UKG.

The teams recorded children’s pre-school and school enrollment status. During the survey, the children were asked to do a variety of cognitive, early language, and early numeracy tasks. Activities to assess their social and emotional development were also undertaken. All tasks were done one-on-one with children at their homes.

The findings show that among children in class 1, as many as 24.5 per cent cannot read letters, 23.4 per cent can read letters but not words. Further, 22.6 per cent can read words but not a class 1-level text or higher, and 29.5 per cent can read a class 1 level text or more.

While talking about the children’s ability to recognize numbers, the report mentions that among those in class 1, as many as 15.8 per cent children cannot even recognize numbers up to nine while 29.8 per cent children can recognize numbers up to nine but cannot recognize numbers up to 99. As many as 54.5 per cent children can recognize numbers up to 99.

Among children in class I, as many as 49.8 per cent can do a single digit oral word addition problem while 42.1 per cent can do a single digit oral word subtraction problem and 64.4 per cent can do a single digit relative comparison task, and so on.