Frankenstein Dinosaur Mystery Solved By Scientists, Chilesaurus Was The Missing Link In Dinosaur Evolution

India.com Buzz Desk
1 / 1

Huge Dinosaurs Did Exist Before The Cretaceous Period, Just Like Jurassic Park Suggested: Study

Reports claimed that footprints of several smaller theropod dinosaurs were also found in the same surface.

Finally scientists from Cambridge University and the Natural History Museum in London have been able to place a dinosaur in its rightful place in history. The dinosaur had an incredibly puzzling design of its body due to which it was difficult to place it in the dinosaur family tree. The Chilesaurus was nicknamed the “Frankenstein dinosaur” as it was unrelated to other dinosaur species. However, due to the study and findings of Matthew Baron, a PhD student at the Cambridge University and Paul Barett of Natural History Museum London concluded that the Frankenstein dinosaur was one of the first ornithischians, a group of dinosaurs that included horned Triceratops and Stegosaurus. These two categories of dinosaurs sported a series of bony plates along their back. The Chilesaurus has been labeled as a transitional species between the herbivorous dinosaurs and the meat eater-Tyrannosaurus rex. Patagotitan Mayorum: Largest Known Dinosaur Finally Gets A Name

When the fossils of Chilesaurus were discovered, it was believed it to be a part of the Theropod group of dinosaurs which included the T.rex because of its advanced digestive system. However, Chilesaurus were not particularly suited for consuming meat. The researchers have finally concluded that the Chilesaurus was a plant-eater and is a member of the group called Ornithischia – meaning “bird hipped” that included Stegosaurus and Triceratops which were herbivorous. The team of scientists concluded that the Chilesaurus was the in-between species of the two groups of dinosaurs. Ancient Sea-Going Crocodile Named After Motorhead’s Frontman Lemmy Kilmister

The study was published in the Royal Society Journal Biology Letters by Paul Barett and Matthew Baron. Reportedly, Paul Barett the co-author of the study said, “Chilesaurus is one of the most puzzling and intriguing dinosaurs ever discovered. Its weird mix of features places it in a key position in dinosaur evolution and helps to show how some of the really big splits between the major groups might have come about.” Matthew Baron the other co-author said, “Before this, there were no transitional specimens — we didn’t know what order these characteristics evolved. This shows that in bird-hipped dinosaurs, the gut evolved first, and the jaws evolved later — it fills the gap quite nicely.”

(Article Edited By – Vandana Srivastawa)