First Case Of 'Deadly' Herpes Simplex Virus Reported In India

·2-min read

The second wave of Covid-19 has given many shocks to the country. Scientists found that a new deadly variant of coronavirus B.1.617.2 was driving the explosive surge in cases and deaths. As the second wave was peaking, some recovered Covid patients were diagnosed with black fungus. Then cases of white and yellow fungus infections also emerged.

Now, a hospital in Ghaziabad, just a few kilometres from the national capital Delhi, has reported the first case of herpes simplex virus infection, and has even termed the new disease “very dangerous”.

According to doctors, Covid recovered patients who have weakened immunity or suffering from an existing ailment are the most susceptible to herpes simplex virus. The treatment of this disease is very costly, and the emergence of this virus has alerted the scientific community as it is considered deadly.

Dr BP Tyagi from Ghaziabad said the first-ever case of herpes simplex virus in India was found in the nose of a patient. Dr Tyagi termed the virus “very dangerous”, and said if there is a delay in treatment then this virus can be deadlier than Covid-19.

Dr Tyagi also informed that the patient is undergoing treatment at his hospital. He also underlined the heavy cost for the treatment, although the patient is being supervised carefully due to the availability of medicines.

The doctor also urged people who have recovered from Covid-19 to remain cautious as they can attract such diseases due to their weakened immune system post hospitalisation.

The instances of post-recovery complications have increased in the country, and some people are reporting severe health issues such as hearing impairment or blood clots leading to gangrene. Doctors are suspecting the new variant found in India is behind these increased cases of rare occurrences.

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