Euro 2020 draw: When is it, who has qualified, are England seeded and how does it work?

Mark Critchley
The European Championship trophy next to the logo for Euro 2020: Getty Images

England and Wales will learn their Euro 2020 fate on Saturday following their successful qualifying campaigns.

Gareth Southgate’s side progressed as group winners, winning all but one of their games in Group A to reach next summer's finals.

Wales, under the management of Ryan Giggs, finished second in Group E ahead of Slovakia and Hungary to reach only their third major international tournament.

Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland still harbour hopes of qualifying but must come through the revamped 16-team play-offs, which are scheduled to be held in March.

The tournament will be played in 12 host cities and stadiums across Europe, including London’s Wembley, Glasgow’s Hampden Park and Dublin’s Aviva Stadium.

When is the draw?

The group stage draw will take place in Bucharest on Saturday 30 November at 5pm GMT.

Who has qualified?

Belgium, Italy, Poland, Russia, Spain, Ukraine, France, Turkey, England, Czech Republic, Finland, Sweden, Croatia, Austria, Netherlands, Germany, Portugal, Switzerland, Denmark and Wales have already qualified for next summer’s tournament.

How does the seeding work?

Seeding is based on each national side’s performances in qualifying.

The six best-performing group winners will be top seeds, the remaining group winners and best runners-up will be in Pot 2.

The next best group runners-up will be in Pot 3, while the remaining runners-up and the play-off winners will be placed in Pot 4.

Pot 1: Italy, Belgium, England, Germany, Ukraine, Spain

Pot 2: France, Switzerland, Poland, Croatia, Netherlands, Russia

Pot 3: Portugal, Denmark, Turkey, Austria, Sweden, Czech Republic

Pot 4: Finland, Wales, Play-off A, Play-off B, Play-off C, Play-off D

How does the hosting work?

Euro 2020 will be the first championships to be hosted by multiple countries – 12 in total, including England, Scotland and the Republic of Ireland.

‘Host nations’ are not guaranteed to qualify for the tournament, but those who do will play at least two group stage games in their own country.

Each host has been paired with another and allocated to one of the six groups. This is the group they will compete in, if they qualify.

England and Scotland have been paired together in Group D, while the Republic of Ireland are paired with Spain in Group E

Host pairings

Group A: Italy, Azerbaijan

Group B: Denmark, Russia

Group C: Netherlands, Romania

Group D: England, Scotland

Group E: Spain, Republic of Ireland

Group F: Germany, Hungary

Whichever team has the superior qualifying record will play all three of their matches at home, including their head-to-head with the other host nation.

For example, if England qualify automatically and Scotland qualify through the play-offs, England vs Scotland in Group D will be played at Wembley.

What stadiums are being used?

Group A: Stadio Olimpico (Rome) and Olympic Stadium (Baku)

Group B: Parken Stadium (Copenhagen) and Krestovsky Stadium (St Petersburg)

Group C: Johan Cruyff Arena (Amsterdam) and Arena Nationala (Bucharest)

Group D: Wembley (London) and Hampden Park (Glasgow)

Group E: San Mames (Bilbao) and the Aviva Stadium (Dublin)

Group F: Puskas Arena (Budapest) and the Allianz Arena (Munich)

When are the play-offs?

For the first time, 16 teams will compete for the remaining four places at the finals in a revamped play-off system.

The draw for the play-offs will take place on 22 November in Nyon, with the 16 nations split into four paths based on Nations League performances.

Eight semi-finals will be played on 26 March, with four finals following on 31 March to determine the play-off winners.

This means that the identity of the four play-off winners will not be known at the time of the finals draw on 30 November.

Four of the six Euro 2020 groups will therefore contain an unknown ‘play-off winner’.