Coronavirus: Why COVID-19 cases are high in Mumbai compared to other cities in India

Alphonse Joseph

New Delhi, Apr 09: The number of COVID-19 positive cases in Maharashtra has breached the 1,000 marks. However, several people believe that the increase in testing capacity has revealed the right numbers.

Taking Mumbai into consideration, the civic body called in the private labs to conduct tests and increase government testing laboratories in the state capital.

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The second reason for the increase in number of cases is continuous contact tracing and clinics testing all asymptotic contacts, which are helpful in clusters, such as Worli Koliwada and Dharavi where the chances of community spreading his high.

In Mumbai's Worli Koliwada, an area with a population of 40,000 has seen around 51 cases, taking the tally of G-South ward to 135.

Also, the 52 positive cases at Wockhardt Hospital, Mumbai Central played a major role in the increase of COVID-19 cases. The hospital was declared a containment zone by the MCGM as its staff members tested positive after they came in contact with coronavirus-hit patients.

Out of 106 cases that were reported in the state capital on Wednesday, as many as 51 cases were from G-South ward and most of them were cases of contact transmissions from patients who have already tested positive.

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The registered COVID-19 positive cases also includes six fresh cases from Dharavi and Mahim, including a 43-year-old man and a nurse working at Breach Candy Hospital.

Also, the Mumbai civic body has made it compulsory for the civilians to wear masks at public places. Issuing a circular, the BMC has also warned of arresting violators under section 188 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) if they fail to follow the rules.

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