BMC`water ATMs’ in high footfall areas

Mumbai: Along the lines of the `water ATMs’ set up at various railway stations, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) is planning to install automated water machines in various parts of the city, particularly high footfall areas visited by tourists.

The plan is to start ‘Water ATMs’ for easy access to pure drinking water at tourist places, parks, the zoo, museums and major hospital centres across the city.

Also Read: BMC planning app to help patients schedule doctor appointments

The corporation has sought proposals from interested companies to take the idea forward. The BMC believes that the usage of plastic water bottles will be reduced due to the installation of the automated drinking water machines.

The idea to introduce water ATMs in the city has been mooted by BJP corporator Asha Marathe, and the proposal was approved in the municipal general assembly.

The civic administration has responded positively to the suggestion. Mumbaikars have to shell out Rs 15-20 to buy a litre of drinking water when they step out of their homes.

“There are many areas that get polluted water as the pipelines pass through gutters, and if water ATMs are installed in the city, people can get drinking water at cheap rates. It will also help in reducing the number of plastic bottles that are discarded after single use,” said Marathe.

Water ATMs are available at some railway stations, and if the plan sees the light of day, they will soon be available at Gateway of India, Girgaon, Juhu Chowpatty and other tourist spots.

The BMC supplies 3,857 million litres of clean drinking water every day from seven dams. The BMC is also undertaking restoration of British-era `pyaus’ or drinking water fountains at many places in Mumbai. Many of the pyaus are not in working condition currently.

“There are many areas that get polluted water as the pipelines pass through gutters, and if water ATMs are installed in the city, people can get clean drinking water at cheap rates. It will also help in reducing the number of plastic bottles that are discarded after single use,” said Marathe.