Biden's Lead Over Trump Grows in Michigan, But the Two Remain Neck and Neck in North Carolina: Poll

·4-min read

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump in Michigan is looking increasingly comfortable but the two remain neck and neck in North Carolina, Reuters/Ipsos opinion polls showed on Tuesday. Reuters/Ipsos is polling likely voters in six states – Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, Florida and Arizona – that will play critical roles in deciding whether Trump wins a second term in office or if Biden ousts him. A week before the Nov. 3 election, Biden leads Trump nationally by 10 percentage points, according to the Reuters/Ipsos poll. The national online survey, conducted Oct. 23 to 27, found that 52% of likely voters said they were backing Biden, while 42% were voting for Trump. Five percent said they were considering a third-party candidate and only 2% said they did not know yet how they would vote. Nearly one-third of American adults said they had already voted. Biden led by 8 points in the previous national poll conducted Oct. 20 to 22. Below is a state-by-state look at Reuters/Ipsos findings, based on the online responses of likely voters: MICHIGAN (Oct. 21 – Oct. 27): ** Voting for Biden: 52% ** Voting for Trump: 43% ** Biden was up 51%-44% the prior week. ** 32% said they already had voted. ** 52% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 39% said Trump would be better. ** 48% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 45% said Biden would be better. NORTH CAROLINA (Oct. 21 – Oct. 27): ** Voting for Biden: 49% ** Voting for Trump: 48% ** Since the margin is within the poll’s credibility interval, the race is statistically tied, as it was in the prior poll when Biden had 49% to Trump’s 46%. ** 35% said they already had voted. ** 48% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 44% said Trump would be better. ** 51% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 43% said Biden would be better. WISCONSIN (Oct. 20 – Oct. 26): ** Voting for Biden: 53% ** Voting for Trump: 44% ** Biden’s advantage is marginally wider than his 51%-43% lead the prior week. ** 33% said they already had voted. ** 52% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 38% said Trump would be better. ** 47% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 45% said Biden would be better. PENNSYLVANIA (Oct. 20 – Oct. 26): ** Voting for Biden: 50% ** Voting for Trump: 45% ** Biden’s lead is marginally wider than in the prior week when he was up 49%-45%, an advantage that was on the edge of the survey’s credibility interval. ** 21% said they already had voted. ** 50% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 42% said Trump would be better. ** 50% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 43% said Biden would be better. FLORIDA (Oct. 14 – Oct. 20) ** Voting for Biden: 50% ** Voting for Trump: 46% ** Biden’s apparent lead is on the edge of the survey’s credibility interval. ** Prior poll showed the two essentially even, with Biden at 49% and Trump at 47%. ** 21% said they already had voted. ** 50% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 42% said Trump would be better. ** 51% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 45% said Biden would be better. ARIZONA (Oct. 14 – Oct. 21): ** Voting for Biden: 49% ** Voting for Trump: 46% ** With the margin within the survey’s credibility interval, the race is statistically tied. ** Prior poll showed Biden with a 50%-46% lead that was on the edge of the survey’s credibility interval. ** 27% said they already had voted. ** 49% said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus pandemic. 43% said Trump would be better. ** 48% said Trump would be better at managing the economy. 45% said Biden would be better. NOTES The Reuters/Ipsos opinion polls are conducted online in all six states in English, as well as in Spanish in Arizona and Florida. ** In Michigan, from Oct. 21 to Oct. 27, it gathered responses from 1,005 adults, including 652 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. ** In North Carolina, from Oct. 21 to Oct. 27, it gathered responses from 1,006 adults, including 647 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. ** In Wisconsin, from Oct. 20 to Oct. 26, it gathered responses from 1,008 adults, including 664 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. ** In Pennsylvania, from Oct. 20 to Oct. 26, it gathered responses from 1,001 adults, including 653 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. ** In Florida, from Oct. 14 to Oct. 20, it gathered responses from 1,005 adults, including 662 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. ** In Arizona, from Oct. 14 to Oct. 21, it gathered responses from 951 adults, including 658 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points.