Apple Watch saves a man's life by detecting low heart rate

1 / 1

Apple Watch saves a man's life by detecting low heart rate

Prior to this, Apple Watch's SOS feature saved a Chicago-based man from drowning after he lost his iPhone while jet-skiing.

Apple Watch has been in the news for all the right reasons of lately. The device has been in news for saving countless lives in the past couple of months. And now, Apple's smartwatch has helped in saving the life of a man with low heart rate.

According to a report by the Telegraph, earlier this month Bradfield, Essex based Paul Hutton received a warning in his Apple Watch that his heart beat constantly dropping below 40bpm, while the normal resting heart rate is between 60bpm and 100bpm.

This prompted the 48-year-old technology writer to pay a visit to the nearest ER where he was diagnosed with low heart rate. In a bid to resolve the issue, Hutton, who is the father of three kids gave up on caffiene. However, his health didn't improve and his Apple Watch kept buzzing with warnings of low heart rate, which prompted him to pay a visit to a specialist who diagnosed him with ventricular bigeminy - a medical condition where the heart beats irregularly and thus is unable to pump blood in the body effectively.

Soon after, Hutton had a three hour surgery called the cardiac ablation - a procedure in which a cathether is inserted through a vein or artery via the groin to the heart. This cathether delivers high energy electric signals to the heart to clear the blockage and allow the heart to beat at frequent intervals.

During the surgery, Hutton was sedated but fully awake. His surgery was a success and he was discharged the day following his surgery. "My surgeon was absolutely brilliant. Once it was done, I had a very welcome cup of tea and was discharged the next day...I keep checking my pulse on my Apple Watch and it all seems good," he told the publication.

As mentioned before, this is not the first time that Apple Watch has helped in saving lives of individuals. Earlier this month, Apple Watch's SOS feature saved a Chicago-based man from drowning after he lost his iPhone while jet-skiing.

In another case, Apple Watch Series 4 helped a doctor save the life of a restaurant goer by helping him detect a medical condition called atrial fibrillation in seconds.