It's Conmen vs Cricketers: After Rahul Dravid, Anil Kumble’s Wife Targeted

After former India captain Rahul Dravid lost over Rs 4 crore to a Ponzi investor, ex-Test skipper Anil Kumble's wife Chethana has alleged that her PAN card details were illegally used by a Mumbai-based company for a transaction worth over Rs 32 lakh.

Bengaluru: Cricket legends from Karnataka seem to be the latest targets of conmen.

After former India captain Rahul Dravid lost over Rs 4 crore to a Ponzi investor, ex-Test skipper Anil Kumble's wife Chethana has alleged that her PAN card details were illegally used by a Mumbai-based company for a transaction worth over Rs 32 lakh.

According to Chethana’s police complaint, she had visited the upscale shopping mall UB City in Bengaluru to buy a Frank Mueller watch. A store called Jimson Watch had procured the piece of her choice from The Timekeeper's Watch Boutique in Mumbai as they did not have the same model in stock at their Bengaluru shop.

Sathya Vageeshwaran, an employee of the Bengaluru shop, had taken her PAN card details and a cheque for Rs 8 lakh.

Chethana alleged that using her PAN card details, Vageeshwaran and employees of the Mumbai shop purchased watches worth over Rs 32.96 lakh.

Her Income Tax returns 26 AS form mentioned that Chethana had purchased two watches worth Rs 32.96 lakh. Her auditours Kincha and Co. advised her to lodge a police complaint.

She said the top watch shops in Bengaluru and Mumbai betrayed her trust and action should be taken against them.

Two weeks ago, Rahul Dravid had complained to the police that a Ponzi company called Vikram Investors had duped him after promising handsome returns on his investments. He alleged that the company returned him Rs 16 crore, but was yet to pay back the remaining Rs 4 crore.

The police have arrested the promoter of the company and his agents, including a sports journalist named Sutram Suresh, who had reportedly convinced Dravid to invest in the firm.

The company has allegedly duped over a hundred wealthy investors and the scam is pegged at Rs 500 crore.