Anish installation to come up at NYC’s Brooklyn Bridge Park

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Anish installation to come up at NYC’s Brooklyn Bridge Park

New York, Apr 27 (PTI) ‘Descension’, one of Anish Kapoor’s most viscerally arresting installations, will be on view at the city’s Brooklyn Bridge Park from next month.

As part of its 40th anniversary season, Public Art Fund brings ‘Descension’ to New York City for the first time.

Sited at Pier 1 in Brooklyn Bridge Park, this massive, continuously spiralling funnel of water will harness one of the most evanescent of materials and create a striking contrast with the adjacent East River, the organisers said.

Best known for his iconic public artworks, Kapoor’s last major outdoor sculpture in New York City was ‘Sky Mirror’, his 35-foot-diameter concave mirror at Rockefeller Center in 2006.

With ‘Descension’, he has created a dynamic negative space that descends into the ground, disturbing the familiar boundaries of the world.

The installation will be on view from May 3-September 10 at the Brooklyn Bridge Park.

“As we celebrate 40 years of bringing remarkable public art to New York City, it’s important to recognise those artists and exhibitions that have shaped the discourse and been so memorable to our broad public audience.

“We’re thrilled that Anish’s newest work will be a highlight of this anniversary season, more than a decade after his outdoor debut with us,” says Public Art Fund director and chief curator Nicholas Baume.

Since the mid-1990s, Kapoor has explored the notion of the void by creating works that seem to recede into the distance, disappear into walls or floors, or otherwise destabilise assumptions about the physical world.

In ‘Descension’, 26-feet in diameter, the spiralling funnel of water is treated with an all-natural black dye, creating an opaque, seemingly endless hole. The whirling pool will be surrounded by a railing, inviting audiences to peer into its dark depths.

Through this transformation of properties inherent to materials and objects, Kapoor blurs the boundaries between nature, landscape, and art, allowing people to perceive space differently.

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.