A timeline of every COVID-19 case in Canada throughout June 1-14

Bryan Meler
·Associate Editor, Yahoo News Canada
·86-min read
A timeline of every COVID-19 case in Canada throughout June 1-14
A timeline of every COVID-19 case in Canada throughout June 1-14

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians are increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

This is a timeline of cases dating from June 1-14. For the latest cases around Canada, you can click here.

June 14

Downward trend continues in Ontario

Ontario reported 197 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, the second day in a week that the province has reported fewer than 200 new cases.

The 0.6 per cent increase brings the total number of cases in the province to 32,189, with 83.8 per cent of those cases classified as resolved, including 423 marked resolved in Sunday's report.

The trend in Ontario has been steadily declining now since June 3.

Twenty-seven of the province's 34 public health units reported five of fewer cases, and 20 of those reported no new cases at all.

Twenty-seven deaths in Quebec

Quebec health officials have added 27 COVID-19 related deaths today, bringing the provincial total to 5,222 since the beginning of the pandemic.

Authorities reported a seventh straight day of fewer than 200 new cases, with 128 on Sunday for a total of 53,952 confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Hospitalizations were down by 19 to 769 while 85 of those patients are in intensive care, a drop of 17.

Of the 27 deaths added today, 14 were classified as new deaths while the other 13 occurred before June 6.

Five days since a new case in Nova Scotia

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 569 tests on Saturday, but no new cases were identified.

On Sunday, the province said there are three active cases remaining out of 1,061 total positive tests.

Two of the active cases are currently in hospital, with one of those in intensive care. To date, Nova Scotia has 48,786 negative test results and 62 deaths.

No new cases in New Brunswick

Public Health announced and no new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, a day after the province's second death from the virus.

To date, 37,072 tests have been conducted, 157 cases have been confirmed and 129 people have recovered.

There are 26 active cases in New Brunswick, most of which are in the Campbellton region, also known as Zone 5.

Four people are in hospital and one person is in ICU.

Fifty new cases in Alberta

Alberta is reporting 50 new COVID-19 cases leaving 422 active cases across the province.

In today’s daily update, health officials relayed there are 46 people in hospital – seven of those are in intensive care. No new deaths were reported, as the death toll remains at 150.

One new case in Saskatchewan

One new coronavirus case was reported in Saskatchewan on Sunday, bringing the provincial total to 665. Health officials say the new case is in Saskatoon.

Among those patients are 628 who have recovered. Active cases in the province rose to 24 — nine in Saskatoon, 10 in the Far North, two each in Regina and the South region, and one in the North region. There are no active cases in central Saskatchewan.

Two people are in the hospital, one of which is receiving inpatient care in the North while another person is in ICU in Saskatoon.

Manitoba latest

Manitoba is reporting one new case of COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases identified in the province to 304.

As of Friday, five cases were still active. The province will next update its data on active cases and recoveries on Monday.

June 13

Least fatal stretch in Ontario in months, but most cases this week

Ontario reported nine COVID-19 related victims in its latest 24-hour stretch, the fewest since April 1.

The latest update increases its death toll to 2,507. The victims are among its 31,992 total cases of COVID-19, after the Ministry of Health identified 266 new cases of COVID-19.

It’s the most cases Ontario has identified this week in a 24-hour stretch, but it also marks the seventh straight day the province has stayed below 300 daily cases, which it hasn’t done since the early stages of the pandemic in March.

The latest patients were identified after health officials completed 27,456 tests for COVID-19. It’s the fourth straight day they’ve surpassed their goal of 16,000.

Of the 266 cases, 182 of them were identified in the Greater Toronto Area.

There are now 26,538 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 351 since Friday’s update. There remains 2,947 active cases around the province, the fewest since April 7.

Among those active patients, there are 489 people in hospital (down by 38), which includes 110 in intensive care (down by four) and 68 who require a ventilator (down by 16).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there remains 63 facilities that are currently experiencing outbreaks. Among those LTCs, there are 539 active cases among residents (down by 72) and 503 among staff (down by 40). Throughout the pandemic, 1,786 residents (up by 10) and seven staff have died.

Another LTC victim in New Brunswick, three new cases

One more resident of the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility in Atholville has passed away, marking the second COVID-19 related victim in the province.

Health officials in New Brunswick also identified three new cases of COVID-19 in the Campbellton region. Two of them involve health-care employees and at the Campbellton Regional Hospital and the other case is a health-care employee at Manoir de la Vallée. They range in age from 20-59.

Of the province’s now 157 cases, there are four people in hospital (down by one since Friday), which includes one in intensive care, and two fatalities.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 36 new cases in the Campbellton region, which includes six people who have recovered (up by one).

They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor at Campbellton Regional Hospital, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting, eventually leading to the outbreak at Manoir de la Vallée.

On Thursday, CBC News reported that the medical professional, Dr. Jean Robert Ngola, is seeking an apology from Premier Blaine Higgs after a private investigation determined he’s not “patient zero.”

Quebec continues to report fewer than 200 daily cases, victim backlog continues

Quebec announced 158 new cases of COVID-19 and 47 related fatalities, increasing its totals to 53,824 and 5,195, respectively.

Of the recent victims, 16 died in the past 24 hours, while the remaining 31 people passed away before June 5, according to a press release by Quebec officials.

The 158 new cases mark the sixth straight day that Quebec has announced less than 200 new daily cases, and the 13th straight day that it’s been below 300.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded less than 300 since March 25. The last time it was under 200 (in mid-March), the province was still only announcing cases that had been confirmed twice.

As of Saturday, there are now 21,281 people who have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 458 since Friday. Of its now 27,348 active cases, there are 788 in hospital (down by 52), which includes 102 in intensive care (down by five).

The Montreal region remains the province’s epicentre with 26,613 cases and 3,189 fatalities, increases of 56 and 31, respectively.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000 after completing 9,493 tests for COVID-19.

One more death, 37 new cases in Alberta

Alberta health officials identified 37 new cases, increasing its total to 7,383.

An additional victim was also reported, involving a man in his 90s at Calgary’s Extendicare Hillcrest, according to Global News, who received confirmation from Alberta Health.

The latest update increases the death toll to 150.

Of its total cases, there are 6,830 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 19 since Friday. Of the 403 active cases that remain, there are currently 44 patients in hospital (down by nine), while there remains six people in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 331,938 tests for COVID-19.

Manitoba reports two new cases

Two new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Manitoba, increasing the total to 303.

Among those patients are 289 who have recovered, leaving seven active cases in the province. The death toll remains at seven.

Health officials in Manitoba did not hold a press conference Saturday to discuss the latest cases; through a tweet, they said they’ll be updating their online data Monday.

Patient identified in Saskatchewan

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in Saskatchewan’s Far North, increasing the province’s total to 664.

Among its total cases are 628 who have recovered, an increase of one since Friday. Of the 23 active cases that remain, 10 of them are in the Far North.

According to a press release, there is one person in intensive care in Saskatoon and one in inpatient care in the North.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials in Saskatchewan have performed 55,122 tests for COVID-19.

June 12

Alberta’s top doctor warns of ‘increased potential’ of spread as province reopens

With Stage 2 of the province’s relaunch starting today, chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said, "with the increased opportunity for activities and gatherings, there is increased potential for all of us to be exposed to COVID-19."

Stage 2 features the reopening of indoor recreation areas, which includes gyms and pools, to go along with theatres, wellness and personal services, as well as schools for certain exams and summer courses.

Outdoor events and indoor seated events, such as funeral ceremonies and weddings, can take place with a maximum of 100 people, while indoor social gatherings now have a maximum capacity of 50. As long as physical distance and public health measures are in place, there will no longer be caps on the amount of people who can attend worship gatherings, or patronize cafés, restaurants, bars and lounges.

Since it entered Stage 1 on May 14, Hinshaw has warned people of the impact of increased social gatherings amid COVID-19. Of Alberta’s 386 active cases, 60 per cent of them are under the age of 40, signalling a different trend compared to prior stages of the pandemic.

“Over the past few weeks, we’ve started to see a younger demographic testing positive for COVID-19,” said Hinshaw. “We’re also seeing a particular increase between those aged 20-29.”

Recently, health officials have also seen a rise in Edmonton, where in the past three weeks, the number of active cases went from 58 to 149. Hinshaw said there hasn’t been a single source or cause that’s been identified, and two thirds are linked to a known source.

No cases have also been linked to recent anti-racism protests and demonstrations around the province, said Hinshaw. Protests started on the weekend of May 31 in Alberta, which has led to an increase in testing. Any transmission would also take days to work through the system, she noted.

As Alberta heads into Stage 2, Hinshaw reminded people to maintain distance when possible, to help others in the province who are more vulnerable.

“I am also keenly aware today is not a celebration for everyone,” said Hinshaw. “People will continue to feel anxious… I’m also keenly aware that many residents in continuing care centres and their families continue to feel lonely and isolated. I’m aware of these concerns. I think about these people often.”

On Friday, 30 new cases of COVID-19 were identified in Alberta, after health officials completed 7,746 tests. No additional deaths were reported.

Of its total cases, there are 6,811 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 23 since Thursday. Of the 386 active cases that remain, there are currently 53 patients in hospital (up by eight), while there remains six people in intensive care.

British Columbia reports first death this week

After going six straight days without a new fatality, B.C. health officials reported a recent victim in the Vancouver Coastal health region.

It increases the province’s death toll to 168.

In its latest 24-hour stretch, B.C. health officials also identified 16 new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 2,709.

Of those cases only 187 are active, since 2,354 people have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 10 since Thursday.

Among those currently infected patients, 12 are in hospital (down by one), which includes three in intensive care (down by one).

No new community of health-care COVID-19 outbreaks were identified in the past 24 hours in B.C.

Another doctor diagnosed at New Brunswick’s hospital

Health officials in New Brunswick have identified one new case of COVID-19, involving an employee of the Campbellton Regional Hospital.

It comes a day after identifying two other employees at the New Brunswick hospital.

The latest patient that’s been identified is in their 40s. New Brunswick health officials didn’t hold a press conference on Thursday to discuss the reason for transmission.

Of the province’s now 154 cases, there are five people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care, and one death.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 33 new cases in the Campbellton region, which includes five people who have recovered. They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor at Campbellton Regional Hospital, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

On Thursday, CBC News reported that the medical professional, Dr. Jean Robert Ngola, is seeking an apology from Premier Blaine Higgs after a private investigation determined he’s not “patient zero.”

Ontario reports its fewest daily cases in months, Canada’s surpasses 8,000 fatalities

The Ministry of Health reported 182 new cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, the smallest increase to its total since March 28.

It’s also the sixth straight day that the province recorded less than 300 new daily cases, which it hadn’t done since late March.

The new patients were identified after health officials completed a record-high 28,335 tests for COVID-19.

Among its 31,726 total cases, 26,187 people have recovered from the virus, an increase of 302 since Thursday’s update. Eleven more people have also passed away, raising the province’s death toll to 2,498, and Canada’s toll to over 8,000.

Of the province’s 3,041 active cases (the fewest since April 8), there are 527 people in hospital (down by 11), which includes 114 in intensive care (down by six) and 84 who require a ventilator (up by two).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 63 facilities that are currently experiencing outbreaks (down by two). Among those LTCs, there are 611 active cases among residents (down by 72) and 543 among staff (down by 47). Throughout the pandemic, 1,776 residents (up by four) and seven staff have died.

Quebec, Canada’s worst hit province, continues to trend in a positive direction

Quebec announced 181 new cases of COVID-19 and 43 related fatalities, increasing its totals to 53,666 and 5,148, respectively.

Of the recent victims, 21 died in the past 24 hours, while the remaining 22 people passed away before June 4, according to a press release by Quebec officials.

The 181 new cases marks the fifth straight day that Quebec has announced less than 200 new daily cases, and the 12th straight day that it’s been below 300.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded less than 300 since March 25. The last time it was under 200 (in mid-March), the province was still only announcing cases that had been confirmed twice.

As of Friday, there are now 20,823 people who have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 524 since Thursday. Of its now 27,695 active cases, there are 840 in hospital (down by 31), which includes 107 in intensive care (down by seven).

The Montreal region remains the province’s epicentre with 26,557 cases and 3,158 fatalities, increases of 82 and 28, respectively.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch it failed to meet its goal of 14,000 after completing 8,956 tests for COVID-19.

Manitoba reports first case this week

After six straight days of reporting no new cases, Manitoba health officials have identified a new COVID-19 patient.

Of its 301 total cases are 289 people who have recovered from the virus, and seven who have passed away. Of its five active cases, there is no one in hospital due to the respiratory virus.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials in Manitoba have completed 52,255 tests for COVID-19.

Three new cases across as many Saskatchewan regions

Saskatchewan health officials have identified three new cases in the province, increasing its total case count to 663.

There is one newly identified patient each in the Saskatoon, South and Far North regions.

Twenty-three of the cases are currently considered active, since 627 people have recovered from the virus (an increase of one), and 13 have died. A single patient remains in intensive care in Saskatoon.

To date, 54,508 COVID-19 tests have been performed in the province.

June 11

Outbreak among foreign workers in Quebec

Eighteen of 49 foreign workers at a farm and food-processing company south of Montreal have tested positive for COVID-19, according to Radio-Canada.

Quebec's public health director Dr. Horacio Arruda said Thursday that the situation is under control. The regional health agency was able to quickly respond when the first confirmed case of COVID-19 was reported in late May at Vegpro International in Sherrington, Que., in the Monteregie region.

Vegpro International said in a statement to The Canadian Press that it was originally contacted by the public health agency on May 28 after a Guatemalan worker tested positive. Testing continued on May 30, but Vegpro did not say how many workers tested positive or how many still have symptoms.

The outbreak was made more complicated since workers were living in communal housing, making it harder to social-distance.

The company operates several farms and food-packing plants in Quebec’s Monteregie region, as well as in Florida. It distributes produce throughout Canada and in the northeastern United States.

COVID-19 outbreaks have also been reported among temporary foreign workers in Ontario, British Columbia and Manitoba. About 50,000-60,000 temporary foreign workers come to Canada each year to work in agriculture and food processing, according to the federal government.

Migrant workers have been permitted to come to Canada amid the pandemic, but they must self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival. In early April, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau allocated $50 million in federal funding to help employers of migrant workers as they adapt to the challenges of COVID-19 quarantine rules.

Two new cases, N.B. family doctor looks for apology from premier after ‘destructive Trumpian comments’

Health officials in New Brunswick have identified two new cases of COVID-19, involving employees of the Campbellton Regional Hospital.

One of the individuals is in their 30s and the other in their 40s. New Brunswick health officials didn’t hold a press conference on Thursday to discuss the reason for transmission. Of the province’s now 153 cases, there are five people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care. The death toll remains at one.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 32 new cases in the Campbellton region, which includes three people who have recovered. They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor at Campbellton Regional Hospital, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

On Thursday, CBC News reported that the medical professional, Dr. Jean Robert Ngola, is seeking an apology from Premier Blaine Higgs after a private investigation determined he’s not “patient zero.”

During Ngola's overnight round trip to Quebec to retrieve his four-year-old daughter, he interacted with only a few people. They’ve all since tested negative for COVID-19, according to his lawyer, Joël Etienne.

"Dr. Ngola must have therefore contracted the virus from a vector in New Brunswick; and, therefore, he cannot have been the individual who carried the virus over the border," Etienne wrote in a letter to the premier.

Ngola said he received a call on May 25 informing him that one of his patients tested positive for COVID-19. They had met May 19, but for reasons that did not require physical contact while the patient had no symptoms and was wearing a mask. Upon getting the news, Ngola said he cancelled his shift for that night. He and his daughter both tested positive for COVID-19 shortly after, but neither was showing symptoms.

Higgs has never called Ngola by name, but on May 27 he said an “irresponsible individual” was behind the cluster of cases in Campbellton. His identity was leaked shortly after, and the family doctor has since been the victim of racial attacks both in the Campbellton community and online.

"A racialized Canadian, Dr. Ngola was singled out by the premier of New Brunswick, publicly shamed and outed in social media, contrary to the privacy laws that were enacted to protect him as a patient," the lawyer alleges in the letter.

"These destructive Trumpian comments were premature, careless, showed a blatant disregard for the separation of powers, and have ultimately caused irreparable damage to Dr. Ngola's reputation and career."

Of the province’s 33 cases since March 21, 32 have been in the Campbellton region. The virus spread to a long-term care facility in Atholville, which led to the province’s first and only fatality. The only other active case outside of Campbellton is in the Moncton area (announced earlier this week), and involves a migrant worker whose reason for transmission is believed to be travel related.

Ngola, who has been suspended by Vitalité (a New Brunswick health authority) and is under investigation by the RCMP, is seeking to be reinstated as soon as he is cleared of COVID-19.

Ford tests negative as Ontario’s active cases drop to a low

In its latest 24-hour stretch, Ontario health officials completed a record-high 24,341 tests for COVID-19.

It’s the closest the province has come to hitting its max capacity of 25,000 tests in a day. Throughout that process, Premier Doug Ford and Health Minister Christine Elliott both tested negative for COVID-19, as the province identified 203 new patients.

The two Ontario officials were tested out of an "abundance of caution," after being in close contact with Education Minister Stephen Lecce, who himself tested negative for the virus after being in contact with a COVID-19 patient.

For the first time since late-March, Ontario has now gone five straight days of recording less than 300 new daily cases of COVID-19.

Of its 31,544 total cases, there are 25,885 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 505 since Wednesday’s update. The Ministry of Health also reported 12 fatalities, increasing the death toll to 2,487. That means there are now 3,172 active cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, the fewest since April 8.

Of those who are currently infected, there are 538 people in hospital (down by 42), which includes 120 in intensive care (up by two) and 87 who require a ventilator.

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 65 facilities that are currently experiencing outbreaks (down by three). Among those LTCs, there are 777 active cases among residents (down by 94) and 590 among staff (down by 40). Throughout the pandemic, 1,772 residents (up by six) and seven staff have died.

Quebec continues to report less than 200 new cases

Quebec announced 144 new cases of COVID-19 and 24 related fatalities, increasing its totals to 53,485 and 5,105, respectively.

Of the recent victims, 10 died in the past 24 hours, while the remaining 14 people passed away before June 3, according to a press release by Quebec officials.

The 144 new cases marks the fourth straight day that Quebec has announced less than 200 new daily cases, and the 11th straight day that it’s been below 300.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded less than 300 since March 25. The last time it was under 200 (in mid-March), the province was still only announcing cases that had been confirmed twice.

As of Thursday, there are now 20,299 people who have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 458 since Wednesday. Of its now 28,081 active cases, there are 871 in hospital (down by 43), while there remains 113 in intensive care (down by three).

The Montreal region remains the province’s epicentre with 26,475 cases and 3,130 fatalities, increases of 63 and 13, respectively.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch it failed to meet its goal of 14,000 after completing 9,676 tests for COVID-19.

Two new cases in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan has reported two new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 660.

One of the cases was identified in the Saskatoon region and the other in the Far North.

Of its total cases, there are 626 people who have recovered, an increase of two since Wednesday. Of its 21 active cases, there is one person currently in hospital. The Far North has the most active cases with eight.

Since the start of the pandemic, Saskatchewan health officials have completed 53,853 tests for COVID-19.

Forty new patients in Alberta

Alberta has identified 40 new cases of COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch, increasing its total to 7,316.

The province’s death toll has decreased to 149, but Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health, did not hold a press conference on Thursday to explain the change.

Of its total cases, there are 6,788 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 34 since Wednesday. Of the 379 active cases that remain, 204 are in the Calgary zone and 140 in the Edmonton zone. There are currently 45 patients in hospital (up by three), while there remains six people in intensive care.

Health officials have tested 317,402 people since the start of the pandemic in Alberta.

Sixth straight day without a victim in British Columbia

B.C. health officials have identified 14 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, increasing its total to 2,694.

Of those cases only 183 are active, since 2,344 people have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 16 since Wednesday.

Among those currently infected patients, 13 are in hospital (up by one), which includes four in intensive care (up by one).

No new COVID-19 related deaths have been reported for the sixth day in a row, while there remains five long-term care or assisted-living facilities that continue to have active outbreaks.

June 10

Migrant workers continue to test positive in southwestern Ontario

Thirty-eight additional agri-food workers have tested positive for the virus in the Windsor-Essex public health region, bringing the total number of infections in the sector to over 200 since the start of the pandemic.

Of those cases, about 90 per cent are temporary foreign workers, said the region's medical officer of health Dr. Wajid Ahmed.

"We are seeing a ... spike in our local community cases in the migrant farm or temporary foreign workers population," Ahmed said. "We need to get a better understanding of how we can support that particular group and there's a lot of community players working together outside of the public health trying to find better solution to address them."

About 20,000 migrant workers come to Ontario every year to work on farms and in greenhouses, many travelling from Mexico, the Caribbean and Guatemala. Upon arrival amid COVID-19, they must self-isolate for 14 days.

Outbreaks have affected dozens of migrant workers in Chatham-Kent, Niagara Region and Elgin County. An outbreak in Norfolk County has resulted in 165 workers at a local farm contracting the virus, while seven have had to be hospitalized.

Two migrant workers have also died as a result of COVID-19 in Windsor-Essex. The fatalities led to a new testing initiative in the Windsor-Essex region. Starting this Tuesday, various health organizations and local hospitals started to conduct a “mass swabbing” to test 8,000 migrant workers over the course of 10-14 days.

Quebec stays below 200 cases for third straight day

Quebec announced 156 new cases of COVID-19 and 52 related fatalities, increasing its totals to 53,341 and 5,081, respectively.

Of the recent victims, 25 died in the past 24 hours, while the remaining 27 people passed away before June 2, according to a press release by Quebec officials.

The 156 new cases marks the third straight day that Quebec has announced less than 200 new daily cases, and the 10th straight day that it’s been below 300.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded less than 300 since March 25. The last time it was under 200 (in mid-March), the province was still only announcing cases that had been confirmed twice.

As of Wednesday, there are now 19,841 people who have recovered from the respiratory virus, an increase of 480 since Wednesday. Of its now 27,419 active cases, there are 914 in hospital (down by 47), while there remains 117 in intensive care.

The Montreal region remains the province’s epicentre with 26,412 cases and 3,117 fatalities.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 7,800 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario continues to stay below 300-case mark

For the first time since late March, Ontario has identified under 300 cases for four consecutive days.

On Wednesday, the Ministry of Health reported 251 new patients after completing 19,941 tests for COVID-19.

On Sunday, the province announced 415 confirmed cases of COVID-19, but that 223 of them “were impacted by a laboratory-to-public health reporting delay.” That means 192 cases were identified in that 24-hour stretch, the fewest since March 28.

Of the province’s now 31,341 cases, there are 25,380 patients who have recovered from the respiratory virus. Ontario's death toll stands at 2,475, after 11 more fatalities were reported since Tuesday’s update.

Of the 3,486 active cases, there are 580 people in hospital (down by 20), which includes 118 in intensive care (up by two) and 86 on ventilators (down by two).

In Toronto, the province’s epicentre, 121 new COVID-19 infections were identified in the latest 24-hour stretch, in which 403 patients also recovered. In total, there have been 12,949 cases in the city with 10,310 recoveries and 956 deaths.

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 68 facilities that are currently experiencing outbreaks. Among those LTCs, there are 777 active cases among residents and 630 among staff. Throughout the pandemic, 1,766 residents and seven staff have died.

Nova Scotia’s most fatal outbreak has no more active cases

There are no active cases at the Northwood long-term care facility in Halifax, which has been home to 53 of the province’s 62 total deaths.

The remaining 193 residents and staff members, who survived after contracting the respiratory virus, have now all recovered.

With no cases among LTCs in the province, Premier Stephen McNeil said outdoor visits will be allowed beginning Monday, while noting that the change will also apply to homes for people with disabilities.

On Wednesday, Nova Scotia health officials also announced that they’ve decided to alter their data by integrating their lab data and public health reporting system. It’s a first for all provinces in Canada.

The change has added one additional case to its total, involving a “Nova Scotian who tested positive for COVID-19, but who is not currently in the province and was not tested here,” according to a press release.

No new patients were identified in the past 24 hours. Of Nova Scotia’s 1,061 patients, there are 994 who have recovered from the virus.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have also performed 46,668 negative tests for COVID-19.

Two new cases in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan has reported two new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 658.

One of the cases was identified in the Saskatoon region and the other in the South region.

Of its total cases, there are 624 people who have recovered. Of its 21 active cases, there is one person currently in hospital. The Far North has the most active cases with seven.

Since the start of the pandemic, Saskatchewan health officials have completed 53,116 tests for COVID-19.

Four new cases in New Brunswick

Health officials in New Brunswick’s Campbellton region have identified four new cases of COVID-19, all linked to the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility in Atholville.

Two of the people are in their 50s, while the other cases involve individuals in their 80s.

Dr. Jennifer Russell, chief medical officer of health, also provided an update on the case announced on Tuesday. The patient is a temporary foreign worker and officials believe his reason for transmission is travel related. It marks the only active case in New Brunswick outside of the Campbellton region.

Temporary foreign workers are able to come to Canada, but they must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, which Russell said was the case with the infected individual in the Moncton region.

The latest four cases linked to the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility are part of the province’s biggest outbreak.

The province previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 30 new cases in the Campbellton region, which includes one person who has recovered. They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

Of the province’s now 151 cases, there are five people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care. The death toll remains at one.

No new fatalities in British Columbia for fifth day in a row

B.C. health officials have identified 12 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, increasing its total to 2,680.

Of those cases only 185 are active, since 2,328 people have recovered from the respiratory virus.

Among those currently infected patients, 12 are in hospital, which includes four in intensive care.

No new COVID-19 related deaths have been reported for the fifth day in a row, but health officials announced one new outbreak at Holy Family Hospital, a long-term care facility in Vancouver.

In total, five long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active outbreaks.

New hospital outbreak in Alberta

Alberta has identified 47 new cases of COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch, increasing its total to 7,276.

Of the new patients, 22 were identified in the Edmonton zone and 23 in the Calgary zone.

No new fatalities were reported, as the death toll remains at 151.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health, announced a new outbreak at Alberta Hospital in Edmonton. Currently, there are four known COVID-19 cases on staff. No patients have been infected with the virus at this point.

Of the province’s 7,276 cases, there are 6,754 people who have recovered from the virus. Of the 371 active cases that remain, there are 42 patients in hospital, which includes six in intensive care.

Health officials have tested 310,271 people since the start of the pandemic in Alberta.

June 9

Quebec surpasses 5,000 deaths

On Tuesday, the death toll from COVID-19 in Quebec rose to 5,029. There are also 138 new cases reported in the province, bringing the total number of cases to 53,047.

The number of hospitalizations in the province has decreased. There are currently 961 people in hospital, 15 fewer than the day before. One hundred and seventeen of those in hospital are in intensive care, a decrease of four.

The majority of the deaths that took place in the province over the last 24 hours are in long-term care facilities.

As Quebec has now surpassed 5,000 deaths related COVID-19, Premier François Legault apologized for the tragedy people in the province have experienced.

“The message I have is that I’m sorry,” Legault said. “I’m sorry for the decisions that have been taken or not taken for the last 10, 20 years.”

“Of course, we’re sad for the families that are close to these people.”

The premier went on to say the number of cases coming from long-term care homes and senior facilities has been of particular concern.

“4,500 were coming from those residences so there were clearly some problems...the number of employees, salary they were paid,” Legault said. “I think we really need to change the situation and make sure...what happened will be a lesson for Quebec.”

B.C. goes four days with no reported deaths

The death toll due to COVID-19 has remained at 167 since Friday, Dr. Bonnie Henry said on Tuesday. She did however stress during a press conference that while it’s good news, it’s not a reason to be less vigilant.

"The global case count continues to rise and many regions are facing a resurgence in cases. Just yesterday was the highest single day for new cases globally. This is concerning for all of us," Henry said.

There are 2,669 cases of COVID-19 confirmed in B.C. as of Tuesday, with 183 cases still considered active. Sixteen people remain in hospital, including four in intensive care.

Alberta identifies 27 new cases

There are now 7,229 cases of COVID-19 that have been identified in the province. 356 cases in the province are considered active. Alberta also reported two additional deaths, bringing the death toll related to COVID-19 to 151.

Premier Jason Kenney announced on Tuesday that the province would be moving into Stage 2 of its reopening plan, ahead of when it was originally expected to happen. Starting June 12 (instead of June 19), Albertans will see public libraries, wellness services, movie theatres, community halls and team sports resume once again, K-12 schools will also be open for summer school and diploma exams.

Nova Scotia announces one new COVID-19 death

A woman in her 70s is the latest person who has died for reasons related to COVID-19. She had underlying health conditions, and was not a resident of a long-term care home. She lived in the Central region. The death toll due to COVID-19 in Nova Scotia is now 62.

The province also identified one additional case of COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases to 1,060.

Northwood long-term care facility in Halifax remains the only LTC facility in the province with an active outbreak of COVID-19.

One new COVID-19 case identified in New Brunswick

A person between 20 and 29 in the Moncton region is the latest individual to test positive for COVID-19 in the province. The case is related to travel, and not to any of the outbreaks in New Brunswick at this time.

The total number of cases in New Brunswick is now 147, and one person has died after contracting COVID-19.

All regions of the province except for Zone 5 are currently in the Yellow level of the province’s recovery plan. Zone 5 (Campbellton region), which is where an outbreak has been identified in Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility in Atholville.

Ontario reports 14 new deaths in the province

There are now a total of 2,464 deaths related to COVID-19 in Ontario. The province also reported 230 new cases, bringing the total number of cases in the province to 31,090.

The total number of cases that are residents in long-term care facilities is 5,274, or 17 per cent of all cases. There have been 1,738 deaths of residents of residents in LTCs related to COVID-19, or 64.3 per cent of all deaths in the province due to the virus, according to the Ministry of Long-Term Care daily report.

Please see note at end of article with regards to Ontario's long-term care reporting structure compared to the Ministry of Health’s.

June 8

British Columbia sees no new deaths over the weekend

In the previous three 24-hour reporting periods, no COVID-19-related deaths have been recorded by the province, officials announced on Monday. There were however 30 new cases reported in that time, bringing the total number of cases in B.C. to 2,659. Most of the new cases in B.C. are related to known outbreaks, including one large family gathering.

Sixteen people are currently hospitalized with the virus in B.C., including four in intensive care. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says if British Columbians are conscientious today in the measures they take, there is a high chance that travel within the province will be possible for the summer vacation season.

"We can all enjoy this summer," Henry said. "What you do today does make a difference."

Alberta confirms 64 new cases

A total of 7,202 cases of COVID-19 have been diagnosed in Alberta, including 64 reported on Monday. Since Alberta does not report on Sunday, this is the total number of cases added over the last two days There were also three deaths reported, bringing the provincial total number of deaths related to COVID-19 in Alberta to 149.

Since Alberta made tests available to anyone who wanted one on May 12, 14,853 tests of asymptomatic people have been completed. Six of those tests were positive; the patients had no symptoms, no connection to known cases and no connection to an outbreak.

Two more COVID-19 deaths reported in Saskatchewan

The latest COVID-19-related deaths in the province are both in the Far North region, the province announced on Monday. One person was in their 60s while the other was in their 70s.

There were also four new COVID-19 cases diagnosed, including three in the Saskatoon region and one in the Far North region.

New Brunswick reports nine new cases

There are now 146 cases of COVID-19 that have been diagnosed in New Brunswick, including 121 that have recovered. There remains only one COVID-19-related death in the province.

Of the nine new cases, eight are linked to an outbreak at the long-term care facility Manoir de la Vallée in Atholville. The ninth case is related to a previously-confirmed case. Seven of the new cases are between the ages of 60 and 89, and two are above the age of 90.

Quebec sees drop in number of deaths due to COVID-19

The province reported 198 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing Quebec’s total number of cases to 53,047. There were also six reported deaths, which is the fewest number of deaths reported in a single day since April 1. There have been 4,984 deaths in total.

Due to the encouraging trend in numbers, Premier Legault says small gatherings will soon be permitted. Starting June 15, indoor gatherings of up to 10 people will be permitted in most of the province, and June 22 in Montreal. This will include the outdoor dining areas of restaurants.

Ontario sees smallest increase to its total case count in two months

On Monday, health officials reported the smallest increase to its total case count since March 29, with 243 new patients.

It comes a day after that the province reported 415 confirmed cases of COVID-19, but that 223 of them “were impacted by a laboratory-to-public health reporting delay.” That means 192 cases were identified in that 24-hour stretch, the fewest since March 28.

Since the start of the outbreak, Ontario health officials have identified 30,860 cases of COVID-19. The number of people who have recovered from COVID-19 also continues to increase. There are 24,492 people who have recovered from the virus, which includes cases that are 14 days past their initial reporting and did not result in death, and are not currently hospitalized.

There were also 24 deaths related to COVID-19 reported Monday, bringing the provincial death toll to 2,450. In Ontario, 7.9 per cent of all reported cases of COVID-19 have resulted in death.

Long-term care homes remain a key concern for the province, as 78 LTCs currently have active COVID-19 outbreaks. There have been 1,720 deaths of residents in long-term care homes in Ontario, and seven deaths of staff members related to COVID-19.

Please see note at end of article with regards to Ontario's long-term care reporting structure compared to the Ministry of Health’s.

June 7

Fewest deaths in Quebec since April, another low in cases

Quebec health officials have announced eight more people have died in the province, which marks the smallest increase to its death toll since three fatalities were reported April 2.

It’s also the first time since that early-April date that the province reported a single-digit increase in victims.

Along with the recent deaths, the province announced 225 new cases of COVID-19, marking the smallest increase to its total since March 21. It’s now the seventh straight day that it’s logged less than 300 new cases. Before the recent stretch, it hadn’t recorded less than 300 daily cases since March 25.

Of its 52,849 total cases, there are 18,714 people who have recovered from COVID-19, an increase of 302 since Saturday’s update. Of the 29,157 active cases, there are now 972 people in hospital (down by nine), which includes 128 in intensive care (down by one).

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 26,205 cases (up by 83) and 3,067 deaths (up by five).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. For the ninth straight occasion, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 12,657 tests for COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Ontario reports fewest daily cases since March, but another reporting delay

The Ministry of Health reported 415 confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, but 223 of the cases “were impacted by a laboratory-to-public health reporting delay.”

That means 192 cases were identified in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, which marks the fewest new daily cases reported since March 28.

On Monday, Ontario health officials announced that roughly 700 confirmed cases of COVID-19, dating back to April, were not flagged to public health officials due to a mixup between two hospitals.

According to CBC News, about 430 of the cases are expected to be added to Ontario’s count throughout the upcoming days. The majority of them are from Toronto, Peel Region and York Region.

On Saturday, Ontario first reported a “laboratory-to-public health reporting delay,” which was behind 68 of its 455 cases.

The most recent update on Sunday increases the province’s total to 30,617. The Ministry of Health was able to identify the new patients after completing 19,374 tests for COVID-19; it marks the fifth straight day that it’s hit its goal of 16,000.

Of its total cases, there are 24,252 people who have recovered from the respiratory virus, up by 305 since Saturday. Of its 3,939 active cases, there are 635 people in hospital (down by 38), which includes 117 in ICU and 92 who require a ventilator (down by five)

On Saturday, the Ministry of Health also recorded 19 more fatalities, increasing the death toll to 2,426.

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 77 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by six), where there are 884 active cases among residents (down by 39) and 664 among staff (down by 21). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,719 residents (up by two) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

New Brunswick identifies another case in Campbellton region

One case has been identified in New Brunswick’s Campbellton region, after the province went two straight days without a new case.

The latest patient is an individual above the age of 90, and his reason for transmission is linked to the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility, according to a press release, which did not specify if the individual was a resident.

There are now 10 cases linked to the facility, which includes one recent victim, and a Quebec employee whose case is reflected in that province’s statistics.

In New Brunswick, there are now four people in hospital, while no one is in intensive care.

The province previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 17 new cases in the Campbellton region, sixteen of which are considered active. They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

Instead of following a mandatory 14-day self-isolation period following his trip to Quebec in May to pick up his daughter, the doctor returned to work and saw patients during a two-week stretch at Campbellton Regional Hospital in the Restigouche area.

On May 28, a health-care worker at Manoir de la Vallée was diagnosed with COVID-19, prompting all staff and residents to get tested. She was in contact with the family doctor on May 20, said Guy Tremblay, the president of Groupe Lokia, which owns the special care home for seniors.

Officials were able to link all of the initial patients after identifying the family doctor, whose case was announced on May 27. Premier Blaine Higgs called him an “irresponsible individual,” who was “not forthcoming” about the reasons for his trip upon returning to New Brunswick. The doctor has since been suspended as RCMP and Vitalité Health Network (a New Brunswick health authority) investigate to potentially lay charges.

In an interview with Radio-Canada’s La Matinale, the doctor said he’s not sure how he contracted the virus, saying he might have caught the virus from a patient on May 19. Throughout this overnight trip to Quebec, he said he made no stops to come into contact with anyone, while none of his family members were showing COVID-19 symptoms. He and his daughter have both since tested positive, after discovering that one of his patients had contracted the virus.

Because of the outbreak, the Campbellton region remains in the “Orange” phase, while other regions are in “Yellow” as part of the province’s reopening plan. The Orange phase prohibits personal services such as barbers and spas from reopening.

One new case in Nova Scotia

Health officials in Nova Scotia have identified a new COVID-19 patient, after going three straight days without a new case.

Of its now 1,059 cases, there are 999 people who have recovered from the virus. The Northwood LTC in Halifax is the only licensed long-term care home in the province with an outbreak; it has one resident and staff member who are currently infected.

To go along with its positive cases, Nova Scotia health officials have completed 45,466 negative test results since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in Canada.

June 6

Quebec reports some of its best stats since March

On Saturday, Quebec reported 226 new cases of COVID-19, marking the smallest increase to its total since March 21.

It’s now the sixth straight day that it’s logged less than 300 new cases. Before the recent stretch, it hadn’t recorded less than 300 daily cases since March 25.

Of its 52,624 total cases, there are 18,412 people who have recovered from COVID-19, an increase of 648 since Friday’s update. Of the 29,242 active cases, there are now 981 people in hospital (down by 49); it’s the first time since April 15 that there have been less than a 1,000 patients in Quebec hospitals. Among its patients, there are now 129 in intensive care (down by two).

On Saturday, the province also announced 35 fatalities, raising the death toll to 4,970. According to a press release, 22 of those deaths were recorded in its latest 24-hour stretch, while 13 occurred before May 30.

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 26,122 cases (up by 97) and 3,062 deaths (up by 15).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. For the eighth straight occasion, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 10,789 tests for COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Second migrant worker dies in Ontario

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has recorded the death of a second migrant worker who passed away due to COVID-19 complications.

The 24-year-old man died on Friday, according to Windsor Regional Hospital, who have contacted his family in Mexico.

Before being admitted to hospital on June 1, the victim was self-isolating at a hotel. Over the last few weeks, workers who have not been able to safely self-isolate in bunkhouses provided by their employers have been moved to hotels, the health unit reported.

Through a press release, the hospital announced that starting Tuesday it will partner with various health organizations and local hospitals to conduct a “mass swabbing.” Together, they’ll test 8,000 migrant workers in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit over the course of 10-14 days.

Last weekend, a 31-year-old migrant worker in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit passed away, marking a first in the province. He did not have any underlying health conditions, and arrived in Canada from Mexico in February.

Migrant workers have been permitted to come to Canada amid the pandemic, but they must self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival. In early April, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau allocated $50 million in federal funding to help employers of migrant workers as they adapt to the challenges of COVID-19 quarantine rules.

About 20,000 migrant workers come to Ontario each year to work in greenhouses and on farms, many from Mexico, the Caribbean and Guatemala.

Hundreds of cases among migrant workers have been reported across Ontario at farms part of the Haldimand-Norfolk, Windsor-Essex, Niagara Region, Southwestern and Chatham-Kent public health units.

Migrant workers have complained about a lack of information and proper equipment to protect them from getting infected, according to the United Food and Commercial Workers union in Canada.

On Monday, Premier Doug Ford reported that 80 of Ontario’s 404 new daily cases involved migrant workers at farms in southwestern Ontario.

“I will definitely be addressing this with public health to make sure that we get all the migrant workers tested to keep them safe, to keep the supply chain and the food safe,” said Ford. “We're on this.”

Ford starts delivering on promise as Ontario continues to hit its testing goal

For the third straight day, the Ministry of Health has reported a record-high testing output, this time by completing 23,105 tests.

The province is above its goal of 16,000 tests in a day, and Saturday marks the closest it has come to reaching its max capacity of 25,000.

Ontario’s seven-day testing average is now at its highest ever mark at 18,690 tests. It’s the start of a promise that Premier Doug Ford made in late May, after the province had come under fire for its testing outputs.

"We’re going to ramp up the testing like this province has never seen. Another three, four weeks, we’re going to do a lot of testing, I can stand here and promise you that, I’m going to be all over this testing," said Ford on May 20, noting that he was “shocked” by Ontario’s outputs.

Over the past month and a half, the province has seen its testing outputs fluctuate. Between April 28-May 7, Ontario had a three-day stretch (May 1-3) where it hit its goal of 16,000 tests each time, but failed to meet that mark on the days before and after. Between May 8-17, the province went through a 10-day stretch where it hit its goal on seven different occasions. In the following 10-day stretch (May 18-27), it failed to meet it each time.

In an effort to increase testing, Ford said on May 25 that anyone who is concerned they may have COVID-19 won’t be refused a test at any of the province's assessment centres. On May 29, the province released a new testing plan, which includes "targeted campaigns" aimed at testing employees in key, high-risk sectors such as agri-food, auto and retail industries.

The province has now hit its goal (16,000) over eight of the last 10 days. Ford and health officials have said on multiple occasions that increased testing is crucial in understanding the scope of the virus’ impact on the province, and that without it they won’t be able to make follow-up decisions for how to further reopen the economy.

On Saturday, the province announced that it’s extending its emergency orders for another 10 days to June 19. The orders include banning people from gathering in groups larger than five, and from dining in bars and restaurants.

Along with the record-high testing, the province on Saturday announced 455 additional cases to its total of 30,202.

Of those new patients, 68 were impacted by a laboratory-to-public health reporting delay, according to Ontario’s epidemiology summary. It’s not clear at this point which day those cases belong to. Of the 455 cases announced Saturday, 387 of them were discovered in the past 24 hours.

The Greater Toronto Area continues to be the province’s epicentre; of the 455 cases announced Saturday, 386 of them were in the GTA. In total, since the start of the pandemic, 20,193 of the province’s 30,202 cases have been located in the area.

On Saturday, the Ministry of Health also recorded 35 more fatalities, increasing the death toll to 2,407.

Of its total case count, there are 23,947 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 364 since Friday. Of the 3,848 active cases that remain, there are 673 in hospital (down by 76), which includes 117 in intensive care (down by one) and 97 who require a ventilator (up by three).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 83 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by two), where there are 923 active cases among residents (down by 46) and 685 among staff (down by 47). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,717 residents (up by 25) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Alberta sees large spike in cases

Alberta reported 40 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, increasing its total to 7,138.

The recent jump is significant compared to a day earlier, when seven cases were reported, which the chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw called “an occasion to be celebrated.”

The province was able to identify the new cases after completing 5,692 tests, according to Courtney Theriault of City News Edmonton.

Hinshaw did not hold a press conference Saturday to explain the jump in cases.

No new fatalities were reported, as the death toll remains at 146. Of the province’s 7,138 cases, there are 6,656 who have recovered (up by 32 since Friday). Of its 336 active cases, 223 of them are located in the Calgary zone and 76 in the Edmonton zone.

Across the province, there are 44 people in hospital (down by four), which includes six in intensive care.

Saskatchewan’s Far North reports a case for second day in a row

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 650.

No new recoveries were reported on Saturday, while there also remains 11 victims in the province. Of Saskatchewan’s 28 active cases, 18 of them are located in the Far North.

There is still currently one person who is in intensive care in the Saskatoon region, while there are 51 cases among health-care workers, but it’s unclear how many have recovered.

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 51,181 tests for COVID-19.

June 5

Fewest daily cases in Alberta in almost three months

Alberta reported just seven cases in its latest 24-hour stretch, marking the smallest increase to its total since March 12.

Health officials were able to identify the cases after completing a record-high 6,455 tests in a day.

"Today's numbers mark an occasion to be celebrated," said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the chief medical officer of health. "This is in large part thanks to your efforts and sacrifices."

Because of the continuing positive trends, Hinshaw said Albertans can expect an update on Saturday, which will allow for some hospital visits. People still won’t be allow to visit continuing care facilities, she said.

Since May 14, Alberta has been in Stage 1 of its relaunch plan. Officials have said they’re ahead of track, and that they’re planning on moving into their next phase earlier than expected because of the trends they’ve seen since easing restrictions for social gatherings and businesses.

Of the province’s now 7,098 cases, there are 6,624 people who have recovered, which is an increase of 87 since Thursday. Of its 328 active cases, 238 of them are located in the Calgary zone.

Across the province, there are 44 people in hospital (down by four), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 281,979 tests for COVID-19. Alberta’s first case was identified March 5.

British Columbia reports just one new of COVID-19

B.C. health officials announced one new case of COVID-19, but that they’ve also removed a case from yesterday due to a data correction, leaving its total count at 2,632.

The one new case is the fewest since the province reported no new daily cases in early March.

Among B.C.’s total cases are 2,272 who have recovered from the virus, up by seven since Thursday’s update. Of the 193 active cases that remain in the province, there are 21 who are in hospital (down by five) and five in intensive care (down by one).

One more person in the Fraser Health region has also passed away over the past 24 hours, increasing the death toll to 167.

“There have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and the outbreak at the Berkley Care Centre has been declared over. In total, five long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active outbreaks,” read a press release.

B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry did not hold a press conference on Friday.

Truckers continue to test positive in Manitoba

Manitoba announced two new cases of COVID-19, as it reached 300 cases throughout the pandemic.

The latest patients involve a trucker who travelled outside the province, and one of his close household contacts. Both are men, one in his 20s and the other in his 30s, who live in the Winnipeg health region.

Chief provincial public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin couldn’t say whether there were possibly other people exposed to the trucker.

According to CBC, three of Manitoba’s last four cases in the Winnipeg region have been truck drivers. Two other truckers also tested positive for the respiratory virus last week.

"They're doing everything correct: watching for symptoms very closely, getting tested as soon as any symptoms develop and limiting those contacts," said Roussin.

"We know [trucking is] necessary for the transportation of goods. We need that. And so we need to accept some level of risk for it, but from all of these indicators, things are being done right."

In May, health officials had to address an outbreak at a Brandon trucking company, Paul’s Hauling. The company said none of the infected patients were drivers, but 11 people connected to the workplace contracted the virus.

Health officials and the Manitoba Trucking Association continue to work closely together. Truckers who leave the province regularly have been provided the option to get tested even if they aren’t showing symptoms at the end.

Among the province’s 300 total cases, there are now 284 who have recovered. Since seven people have died, there are nine active patients throughout Manitoba.

In its latest 24-hour stretch, 671 COVID-19 tests were completed, bringing the total number of tests to 47,372.

Ontario performs record-high COVID-19 testing

In its latest 24-hour stretch, the Ministry of Health completed its most ever tests with 22,730.

It’s the third straight day that Ontario has reached its goal of 16,000 and it’s the closest the province has come to hitting its maximum capacity of 25,000.

Over the past few weeks, Premier Doug Ford has opened testing to anyone in the province, while "targeted campaigns" have investigated employees in key, high-risk sectors such as agri-food, auto and retail industries. The premier made the recent decisions after Ontario continuously failed to meet its testing goals.

Among the 22,730 recent tests, the province identified 344 new cases, for a total of 29,747. Fifteen more fatalities were also reported, increasing the death toll to 2,372.

There are now 23,583 people who have recovered from COVID-19 in Ontario, an increase of 375 since Thursday. Among its active cases, there are 749 in hospital (down by 27), which includes 118 in ICU (down by three), while there remains 94 on ventilators.

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 85 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by four), where there are 969 active cases among residents (down by one) and 732 among staff (down by 73). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,692 residents (up by 13) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Almost all Quebec students in a class infected with COVID-19

A school in Quebec’s Trois-Rivières has experienced a COVID-19 outbreak, where almost all of its students in one classroom contracted the virus.

After two children at École Louis-de-France were diagnosed with the virus, health officials tested all children part of the class, identifying seven other cases. Since the reopening of Quebec schools has resulted in low attendance numbers, there were 11 or 12 students in the classroom, said a spokesperson for Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec’s regional health authority Julie Michaud.

Officials believe that one child originally contracted the virus in the community, then it spread to other students in the classroom.

École Louis-de-France has remained open, except for the classroom where the main outbreak occurred, which will stay closed until at least June 14 as it’s being disinfected and cleaned. Throughout the rest of the school, one other child and a staff member have tested positive. Among the 11 total patients, some didn’t show symptoms but they’re all in self-isolation as of June 2.

Michaud said to Yahoo Canada that preventative measures were put in place so children can maintain a two-metre distance. Proper hygiene practices were also regularly enforced.

When a case is identified at a school in Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, the individual is sent home to self-isolate and contact tracing is performed. If they are multiple cases in a classroom, authorities close the space and everyone is tested.

Dr. Horacio Arruda, Quebec’s top doctor, has said multiple times over the course of the pandemic that kids aren’t at a high-risk to the virus compared to other age brackets, and that it’s normal to see some cases as the province reopens its school.

Elementary schools around Quebec started to reopen May 11 (with the exception of those in the Montreal area), which was a first for a Canadian province. High schools, CEGEPs and post-secondary institutions around Quebec will also remain closed till the end of August.

During its first three weeks of reopening, there have been 78 cases (44 students and 34 staff) among 72 school boards, according to Quebec’s ministry of education.

The Mauricie region — where Trois-Rivières’ École Louis-de-France is located — had the most cases with 22.

In May, a school in Trois-Rivières, École Saint-Paul, had to close for several days after four teachers and two students tested positive. Arruda said that he believes some of the teachers had become infected before returning to schools.

The province saw 46 per cent of its students at public schools, and 51 per cent of its students at private schools, return to classrooms throughout the first week of reopening. There were about 200,000 students who were eligible to return, according to The Globe and Mail.

Quebec releases deaths from days prior, continues to stay below 300-case mark

On Friday, Quebec reported 50 new fatalities, increasing its death toll to 4,935.

In a press release, officials said that 33 of those deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours. The other 17 occurred before May 29.

Along with the recent victims, the province announced 255 new cases of COVID-19, marking the fifth straight day that it’s logged less than 300 new cases. Before the recent stretch, it hadn’t recorded less than 300 daily cases since March 25.

The latest update increases its total case count to 52,398.

There are also now 17,764 people who have recovered, an increase of 428 since Thursday.

Among its now 29,699 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,030 in hospital (down by 46) and 131 in intensive care (down by 15).

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 26,025 cases (up by 125) and 3,047 deaths (up by 31).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 12,490 tests for COVID-19.

Saskatchewan identifies another patient in Far North

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 649.

Among those cases are 611 people who have recovered, up by three since Thursday, while there remain 11 deaths. Of the 27 active cases, 17 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there is one person who is in intensive care in the Saskatoon region. There remains 51 cases among health-care workers, but it’s unclear how many have recovered.

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 50,597 tests.

June 4

New Brunswick records 1st death after COVID-19 enters LTC in connection to ‘irresponsible’ doctor

New Brunswick reported its first fatality, involving an individual in their 80s with underlying health conditions, who lived at the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility.

Various news organizations have identified him as Daniel Ouellette, after a social media post by his family. He is part of a COVID-19 outbreak in the Campbellton region, which has infected 16 people. One new case was announced Thursday, involving an employee in their 20s at the LTC in Atholville, N.B.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 16 new cases in the Campbellton region. Nine are linked to a long-term care facility (five residents and four staff), which includes a Quebec employee whose case is reflected in that province’s statistics.

They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting. Instead of following a mandatory 14-day self-isolation period following his trip to Quebec in May to pick up his daughter, the doctor returned to work and saw patients during a two-week stretch at Campbellton Regional Hospital in the Restigouche area.

On May 28, a health-care worker at Manoir de la Vallée was diagnosed with COVID-19, prompting all staff and residents to get tested. She was in contact with the family doctor on May 20, said Guy Tremblay, the president of Groupe Lokia, which owns the special care home for seniors.

Officials were able to link all of the initial patients after identifying the family doctor, whose case was announced on May 27. Premier Blaine Higgs called him an “irresponsible individual,” who was “not forthcoming” about the reasons for his trip upon returning to New Brunswick. The doctor has since been suspended as RCMP and Vitalité Health Network (a New Brunswick health authority) investigate to potentially lay charges.

In an interview with Radio-Canada’s La Matinale, the doctor said he’s not sure how he contracted the virus, saying he might have caught the virus from a patient on May 19. Throughout this overnight trip to Quebec, he said he made no stops to come into contact with anyone, while none of his family members were showing COVID-19 symptoms. He and his daughter have both since tested positive, after discovering that one of his patients had contracted the virus.

In New Brunswick, there are now four people in hospital, which includes one person in intensive care. About 300 close contacts of cases are currently in self-isolation.

Quebec continues to report deaths from weeks prior

On Thursday, Quebec reported 91 new fatalities, increasing its death toll to 4,885.

In a press release, officials said that 26 of those deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours. The other 65 occurred before May 28.

Along with the recent victims, the province announced 259 new cases of COVID-19, for a total of 52,143.

There are also now 17,336 people who have recovered, an increase of 238 since Wednesday.

Among its now 29,922 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,076 in hospital (down by 65) and 146 in intensive care (down by 12).

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 25,900 cases (up by 112) and 3,016 deaths (up by 34).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 12,444 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario reports its most daily fatalities in over 3 weeks, completes record testing output

The Ministry of Health reported 45 more victims related to COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch, the most the province recorded since May 12.

The most recent update increased the province’s death toll to 2,357. Ontario also reported 356 new cases, after completing a record-high 20,822 tests in a single day.

Of the province’s 29,403 total cases, there are 23,208 who have recovered from COVID-19, an increase of 397 since Wednesday.

Of the 3,838 active cases that remain, there are 776 in hospital (down by 15), which includes 121 in ICU (down by six) and 94 on ventilators (up by two).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 89 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by 5), where there are 970 active cases among residents (down by 16) and 805 among staff (down by 61). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,679 residents (up by 18) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

On Thursday morning, the Ontario government announced that it appointed Dr. Jane Philpott as the special advisor to support the design and implementation of the new Ontario Health Data Platform. Philpott resigned as a cabinet minister in Justin Trudeau’s government in 2019 over the SNC scandal.

The data platform will provide health system partners and recognized researchers with access to anonymized health data that will allow them to better detect, plan, and respond to COVID-19.

According to a press release, these are the focusses that the new data system will have in its COVID-19 detection efforts;

  • Discovering risk factors for vulnerable populations;

  • Predicting when and where outbreaks may happen;

  • Evaluating how preventative and treatment measures are working; and

  • Identifying where to allocate equipment and other resources.

British Columbia reports four ‘epi-linked’ cases, breaks down data

B.C. health officials announced nine new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 2,632.

Five of the cases are active, but four are people who have already recovered. B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said they’re epidemiologically linked to previous patients who have tested positive, but they themselves were tested for a number of reasons.

Among B.C.’s total cases are 2,265 who have recovered from the virus, up by 22 since Wednesday’s update. Of the 201 active cases that remain in the province, there are 26 who are in hospital (down by six) and six in intensive care (down by one).

No new fatalities were reported in the past 24 hours, while there remains six long-term care or assisted-living facilities that continue to have active outbreaks.

“There has been one new community outbreak with three confirmed cases at the Beresford Warming Centre, a shelter in the Fraser Health region. Public health teams are providing support at the site and for the other seven ongoing community outbreaks,” said a press release.

On Thursday, Henry presented genomic data that showed that most of the COVID-19 cases in B.C. are linked to Europe and Eastern Canada.

For the first time, the province also released more detailed geographic data about its COVID-19 cases, after breaking down its 16 health service delivery areas.

The Lower Mainland, Richmond has had the lowest percentage of cases, with just 444 per million residents. That’s compared to 1,241 cases per million in the area from Abbotsford to Hope in Fraser Health, 911 on the North Shore, and 832 in Vancouver.

Nova Scotia reports one more death outside of LTCs

One additional death has been reported in Nova Scotia, increasing the death toll to 61.

The individual is a male in his 70s with underlying medical conditions in the province’s Central zone; he was not a resident of a long-term care home.

No new cases were reported in Nova Scotia on Thursday, as its total remains at 1,058. That includes 995 people who have recovered, up by two since Wednesday.

Of its active cases, there remain three people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care.

The Northwood long-term care in Halifax is the only facility with active cases; three residents and one staff member (down by one) are still COVID-19 positive.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 43,911 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

Saskatchewan falls below 30 active cases

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in Saskatoon, increasing the province’s total to 648.

Among those cases are 608 people who have recovered, up by six since Wednesday, while there remain 11 deaths. Of the 29 active cases, 18 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there are two people in hospital. Both are in intensive care in Saskatoon.

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 49,915 tests since the start of the outbreak.

Alberta adds to its COVID-19 death toll

The most recent death was a man in his 80s who was a resident of Extendicare Hillcrest, a nursing home in Calgary.

For the second-straight day, Alberta has recorded a COVID-19 fatality, this time involving a man in his 80s who was a resident of the Extendicare Hillcrest nursing home in Calgary.

It had previously gone five-straight days without an increase to its death toll. But the most recent victim increases it to 146.

Fifteen new cases were also identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,091.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 74 since Wednesday. Of its 334 active cases, 247 are located in the Calgary zone.

Across the province, there remains 48 people in hospital, which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 275,524 tests for COVID-19.

June 3

Quebec reports more recoveries than new cases, one patient linked to New Brunswick LTC

Quebec reported 81 new fatalities and 291 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, increasing its totals to 4,794 and 51,884, respectively.

There are also now 17,098 people who have recovered, an increase of 295.

Among its now 29,992 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,141 in hospital (down by 34) and 158 in intensive care (down by three).

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 25,788 cases and 2,982 deaths.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 9,646 tests for COVID-19.

Among its latest cases includes a health-care worker, who’s employed at a New Brunswick long-term care facility, Manoir de la Vallée. The cluster of now 15 cases is believed to have been started after a family doctor didn’t self-isolate following a trip to Quebec himself.

So far, five residents and three staff have tested positive at Manoir de la Vallée.

Two new cases part of New Brunswick’s recent cluster

Health officials in New Brunswick have identified two new cases of COVID-19 in Campbellton region, increasing its total active case count to 15.

One of them is an individual in their 40s and the other is in their 60s. According to a statement, health officials said one is close contact of a previously identified case in the outbreak, and the other is linked to Manoir de la Vallée, a long-term care facility in Atholville.

A Quebec resident, who’s an employee at the LTC in Atholville, has also recently tested for COVID-19. Her case is reflected in Quebec’s statistics.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 15 new cases in the Campbellton region, and eight linked to a long-term care facility (five residents and three staff).

They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

Instead of following a mandatory 14-day self-isolation period following his trip to Quebec in May, the doctor returned to work and saw patients during a two-week stretch at Campbellton Regional Hospital in the Restigouche area.

On May 28, a health-care worker at Manoir de la Vallée was diagnosed with COVID-19, prompting all staff and residents to get tested. She was in contact with the family doctor on May 20, said Dr. Guy Tremblay, the president of Groupe Lokia, which owns the special care home for seniors.

Alberta records its first death in almost a week

Two recent COVID-19 victims were announced Wednesday, after Alberta went five straight days without an increase to its death toll.

One was a woman in her 90s from Extendicare Hillcrest, and the other a woman in her 80s from Intercare Chinook Care Centre.

The two long-term care victims increase the province’s death toll 145, which includes 111 residents in LTCs.

Nineteen new cases were also identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,076.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 50 since Tuesday. Of its 344 active cases, 255 are located in the Calgary zone.

Across the province, there are 48 people in hospital (down by three), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 266,301 tests for COVID-19. Alberta’s chief medical health officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw said they’ve seen an increase in people coming in for testing since they opened it to everyone.

Because of encouraging signs officials have seen in their case trends, the second phase of the province's relaunch could occur ahead of schedule, said Hinshaw.

Ontario gets back on track with testing, below 400-case benchmark

The Ministry of Health reported 338 new cases of COVID-19, increasing Ontario’s total to 29,047.

It marks a slight decrease compared to the last two days, when the province recorded at least 400 cases. Before that two-day stretch, Ontario had stayed below the 400-case benchmark on six straight occasions.

The 338 new patients were identified after 17,537 tests were completed. Before Wednesday, the province had not hit its goal of 16,000 tests for two straight days.

Nineteen more people have died after contracting the respiratory virus since Tuesday’s report, increasing the death toll to 2,312.

Among the province’s total cases are 22,811 people who have recovered, an increase of 327 since Tuesday. Of its 3,924 active cases, there are 791 people in hospital (down by 10), which includes 127 in intensive care (up by two) and 92 people on ventilators (up by five).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 94 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by 11), where there are 986 active cases among residents (down by 95) and 866 among staff (down by 59). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,661 residents (up by nine) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Please see note at end of article with regards to Ontario's long-term care reporting structure compared to the Ministry of Health’s.

Nova Scotia identifies one new case

Health officials in Nova Scotia have identified a new case of COVID-19, increasing its total to 1,058.

Among its total cases are 993 people who have recovered from the virus. Of its active cases, there are three people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care.

The Northwood long-term care in Halifax is the only facility with active cases; three residents and two staff members are still COVID-19 positive.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 43,340 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

One new patient in Manitoba

A total of 298 individuals in Manitoba have contracted COVID-19, after health officials announced one new case Tuesday.

Dr. Brent Roussin, the province's chief public health officer, says the new case is linked to a cluster that now totals four temporary foreign workers in the southern health authority region.

Roussin wouldn’t identify the workplace, but mentioned that protocols regarding self-isolation were followed while there is little risk to the public.

Among Manitoba’s cases are 282 who have recovered from COVID-19, while the death toll remains at seven. It means there are now nine active cases in the province, with no one in hospital.

Since the start of the pandemic, Manitoba health officials have completed 45,923 tests for COVID-19.

New case in Saskatchewan’s Far North

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 647.

Among those cases are 602 people who have recovered and 11 deaths. Of the 34 active cases, 24 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there are two people in hospital. Both are in intensive care in Saskatoon.

Saskatchewan has completed 49,132 tests since the start of the outbreak.

Twenty-two new cases, two outbreaks declared over in B.C.

B.C. health officials announced 22 new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 2,623.

Among those patients are 2,243 who have recovered from the virus, up by 14 since Tuesday’s update.

Of the 214 active cases that remain in the province, there are 32 who are in hospital (up by one) and seven in intensive care (down by one).

One more new fatality was reported in the past 24 hours in B.C.’s Fraser Health region, increasing the death toll to 166.

In the past 24 hours, there have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and two outbreaks have now been declared over at Cottage-Worthington Pavilion and The Cedars in Mission, according to a press release. In total, six long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active COVID-19 outbreaks.

June 2

Two new office outbreaks in B.C.

Two new community outbreaks within office environments have been declared at New World Technologies and at Maersk Distribution Canada Inc. Both workplaces have two cases and are in the Fraser Health region.

On Tuesday, B.C. health officials also reported four new cases of COVID-19, increasing the total to 2,601.

Among those patients are 2,229 who have recovered from the virus, up by 22 since Monday’s update.

Of the 207 active cases that remain in the province, there are 31 who are in hospital (down by one) and eight in intensive care (up by three).

No new fatalities were reported in the past 24 hours in B.C., and the death toll remains at 165.

In more positive news, there have also been no new health care outbreaks, while five outbreaks have now been declared over, including at Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, Amica Edgemont Village, Royal Arch Masonic Home, Chartwell Willow Retirement Community and the Eden Care Centre.

In total, eight long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active outbreaks across B.C.

Alberta identifies 13 new cases of COVID-19

Thirteen new cases were identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,057.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 36 since Monday. Of its 377 active cases, 288 are located in the Calgary zone.

No new fatalities were reported in Alberta for the fifth-straight day, as the death toll remains at 143.

Across the province, there are 51 people in hospital (down by two), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 266,301 tests for COVID-19.

Two additional patients in Manitoba

A total of 297 individuals in Manitoba have contracted COVID-19, after health officials announced two new cases Tuesday.

Among the cases are 278 who have recovered from COVID-19, while the death toll remains at seven. It means there are now 12 active cases in the province, with no one in hosptial.

Since the start of the pandemic, Manitoba health officials have completed 45,099 tests for COVID-19.

Quebec death toll rises to 4,713

Quebec is preparing for its second wave of infections, as Premier Legault announced today that the province is seeking to hire 10,000 orderlies for its long-term care facilities.

A total of 51,593 infections have happened in Quebec, including 4,661 deaths due to COVID-19. There were 239 new infections announced on Tuesday, as well as 52 more deaths. 73.5 per cent of the deaths in the province are people who are over the age of 79. The rate of infection in long-term care facilities remains a key concern.

Legault said during a press conference on Tuesday that anyone interested in signing up to become an orderly can enrol in the three-month program, and will receive a starting salary of $49,000.

“This operation is crucial to prepare ourselves for a possible second wave,” he said.

New Brunswick reports one new case of COVID-19

There are now 133 cases of the virus in the province as of Tuesday. One new case was diagnosed since reporting took place on Monday; the individual is an octogenarian in the Campbellton region and is linked to the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility in Atholville.

All 13 active cases of COVID-19 are in the Campbellton region, and are linked to a family doctor who didn’t self-isolate following a trip to Quebec.

Ontario recoveries continue to increase

A total of 22,484 people have recovered from COVID-19 in Ontario, which according to Johns Hopkins University & Medicine, pushes the national total for recoveries past 50,000.

However Ontario still saw the total number of cases in the province reach 28,709 as 446 new cases were reported since Monday. On Monday evening, it was discovered that 700 positive cases in Ontario, in the Greater Toronto Area, went unreported to the correct public health region, as there was a mixup in which hospital was responsible for doing so. This means that thousands of contacts for these confirmed cases were not contacted by public health, potentially leading to the increase of COVID-19 cases in the area over recent weeks.

There have also been 17 more deaths, bringing the total number of fatalities in the province to 2,293.

June 1

One more death, outbreak declared over in B.C.

On Monday, health officials in B.C. provided an update for the last 48 hours, where they identified 24 new cases of COVID-19.

B.C. doesn’t provide a COVID-19 update on Sundays.

In its first 24-hour stretch, nine new patients were identified. In its second stretch leading up to Monday, another 15 patients were diagnosed with the respiratory virus.

In the past two days, one more person has died in the Fraser Health region, increasing the death toll to 165.

There are now 225 active cases in the province, since 2,207 (out of 2,597 total cases) have recovered from COVID-19.

In a press release, officials said “there have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and the outbreak at The Residence at Clayton Heights has been declared over. In total, 12 long-term care or assisted-living facilities and one acute-care unit have active outbreaks.”

No new deaths in Alberta, 10 cases linked to gatherings in Edmonton

Thirty-four new cases were identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,044.

Of those cases, there are 6,501 patients who have recovered, up by 218 since Sunday.

No new fatalities were reported in Alberta for the fourth-straight day, as the death toll remains at 143.

Across the province, there are 53 people in hospital (up by one), which includes six in intensive care.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, said there has been a recent increase in cases in the Edmonton zone, which is connected to two private family gatherings. At least 10 cases have been linked to the events, but testing and investigations are both ongoing.

Hinshaw said it’s not unexpected to have cases now linked to social gatherings, since the province has permitted outdoor gatherings of a maximum of 50 people and indoor gatherings of a maximum of 15 people. In all instances, people still must maintain a two-metre distance if they’re not from the same household.

Quebec’s new daily cases drop below Ontario daily totals

New numbers out of Quebec show 295 new coronavirus cases today and 20 additional deaths.

Those numbers are the smallest totals of new COVID-19 deaths since April 4, and the fewest new cases since March 25.

There are 1,185 people being treated for COVID-19 in Quebec hospitals as of Monday, down 13 from the 1,198 reported Sunday. Of those in a hospital, 163 are in intensive care, down eight from the 171 reported 24 hours earlier.

Quebec’s daily COVID-19 cases were lower than Ontario today, marking an improving trend for the province. Across Canada, it has the most total cases (51,354) and fatalities (4,661) out of any province or territory.

Ontario reports jump in cases, testing numbers drop again

Ontario reported 404 additional cases of COVID-19 on Monday, a 1.5 per cent jump in newly confirmed infections that marks a slight increase relative to daily growth rates seen over the last week.

It’s the first time over the past seven days that the province recorded more than 400 daily cases of COVID-19. The rise in cases is in part due to over 80 migrant workers who recently tested positive in southwestern Ontario, said Premier Doug Ford.

“I will definitely be addressing this with public health to make sure that we get all the migrant workers tested to keep them safe, to keep the supply chain and the food safe,” said Ford. “We're on this.”

Late Monday, it was announced that a temporary foreign worker from Mexico, passed away after contracting COVID-19. The 31-year-old had no underlying health issues, said Dr. Wajid Ahmed, the medical officer of health for the WIndsor Essex County Health Unit.

The man worked at Woodside Greenhouses Inc., the pepper farm in Kingsville, Ont., and has been identified as Bonifacio Eugenio-Romero.

Drop in testing

The 404 new patients come as the number of tests processed dropped below the province's target of 16,000, after four straight days of surpassing the benchmark. Ontario's network of labs processed 14,379 samples on Sunday. It has the capacity to complete up to 25,000 in a day, according to the Ministry of Health.

There were also 10 more fatalities related to COVID-19 in the province, marking the fewest daily deaths recorded since April 1. The update increased Ontario’s death toll to 2,276.

Saskatchewan reports one new case

A new patient has been identified in the Regina area, but the province’s total remains at 646. One previous case has turned out negative after a second sample was taken, according to a press release by officials.

Six more people have recovered from the respiratory virus since Sunday, increasing the total of resolved cases to 588. Of the 47 active patients, there are four in hospital, including two in intensive care.

There remains 50 health-care workers who have been infected, but the source of infection for each case may not be related to their line of work, according to a press release. It’s unclear how many have recovered.

To date, 48,272 COVID-19 tests have been performed in the province.

Nova Scotia reports one new case

Health officials in Nova Scotia have identified a new case of COVID-19, increasing its total to 1,057.

Among its total cases are 984 people who have recovered from the virus. Of its active cases, there are six people in hospital, which includes two in intensive care.

“There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 10 residents and four staff active cases,” said a press release.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 42,426 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

For a timeline of cases from May 16-31, please check our roundup here.

Note about Ontario’s reporting: The Ministry of Health’s statistics are current as of 4:00 p.m., the day before they are released, and are compiled through the province’s Integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS), which is reliant on local public health units inputting statistics. The system has faced scrutiny for under-reporting Ontario’s numbers; their statistics on LTCs also differ from the Ministry of Long-Term Care.

The Ministry of Long-Term Care’s statistics, released at 10:30 a.m., are current as of 3:30 p.m. the evening before. Their statistics are compiled through immediate contact with long-term care facilities across the province.

The iPHIS also reports statistics among the province’s long-term care facilities, but it includes “all outbreak-related cases and deaths reported in aggregate outbreak summary counts, regardless of whether the case was laboratory confirmed.”