40 Hours, Over 1,000 Clocks: Mammoth Task of Changing Queen Elizabeth's Time Pieces

Buzz Staff
·2-min read

As the UK nears to the end Daylight Saving Time on Saturday night, many people there are gearing up to changing clocks in their houses. A few wall clocks, writs watches, mobile phone timers and that is it about the bi-annual ritual of forwarding the clocks by one hour in spring and rewinding them to one hour in autumn.

A few wall clocks around the house should take you less than an hour. But what happens when your house is lined with a thousand odd clocks? Well, our houses won't be huge enough to accommodate so many clocks, which is not the case with Queen Elizabeth. The British monarch reportedly has 1000 time pieces in her Buckingham Palace residence in London. And to tweak the time in all these clocks, the Queen's Royal Collection Trust staff will spend more than 40 collective hours.

The team of horological conservators have a tough job ahead of them – 450 timepieces at Windsor Castle, 600 at Buckingham Palace and 50 at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, The Independent reported. These time pieces also include several big tower clocks.

"Most of the clocks are quite accurate but every now and then, for no reason, they will suddenly start losing or gaining time – something which I've just started calling 'life'.So I do have to keep a constant eye on them," Fjodor van den Broek, one of the people changing the clocks for the Queen, was quoted as saying by the BBC.

Broek revealed that the kitchens at the Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace are five minutes faster than the other clocks. Reason: to ensure the food arrives on time.

Interestingly, the Queen does not have an alarm clock which needs to be altered too in the mammoth task. She is instead woken up religiously at 9 in the morning by her personal bagpipe player who plays the instrument outside her window.